Thoughts on the New Google Logo from Branding Pros at Aveya Creative

Working on startup brand identity projects day in and day out, we go through our fair share of visual communication concepts. This week we took a step to the side of burgeoning ideas to look at a mammoth worldwide brand’s reawakening. Branding can be quite a subjective matter; here a few of our team members at Aveya Creative share their thoughts.

This year marks Google’s most drastic logo update since 1999.

My initial reaction: it’s about time for Google to choose a sans-serif font. Sticking with the same color scheme is definitely a solid decision. The technical aspects of the logo are of course correct and beautifully executed by its talented designers. However, I for one don’t love it. The ‘G’ is great, but the ‘o’s lack oomph. The ‘e’ at the end is borderline childish; almost like when someone clearly of a certain age tries too hard to look younger through artificial means. — Mariya Bouraima, Founder and Chief Branding Enthusiast

There is certainly a trend towards color blocks and flat design over skeuomorphic (design to look like real life objects) design. And there is a trend towards sans serif fonts (the old logo was a serif font). It is worthwhile for organizations to refresh. While my focus is to help them refresh their product / service offerings so they resonate with their ideal customers, I know how a visual reminder can inspire us to change non-visual things. A bouquet of fresh flowers on your desk can inspire you to reorganize your entire file system! — Carla Brown, Strategist, Pitch Coach and Copywriter

There is certainly a trend towards color blocks and flat design over skeuomorphic design.

The secret to a good visual identity for a brand is not just an attractive logo, but rather, a full visual identity system. This is exactly what the Google redesign aims to do and why it works so beautifully. A brand, especially one the size of Google, lives in many places and needs to adapt to each one accordingly. Not only did Google ensure that the new logomark adapts to media and interfaces of all kinds and sizes, but it also brought in other brand elements, such as the animated dots and the stand alone G, which will presumably become the brand’s main symbol down the road.

While I applaud the creation of an entire system, I do wonder how enduring the logo will be. Great logos, such as Chanel’s double C’s or Nike’s swoosh, reject trend design and have proven to stand the test of time. Google’s logo puts strong emphasis on screens and mobile, which may mean that the brand will require another redesign down the road to adapt to future innovations.— Lisa Fischer, Brand Identity and UX Designer

Great logos, such as Chanel’s double C’s or Nike’s swoosh, reject trend design and have proven to stand the test of time. Google’s logo puts strong emphasis on screens and mobile, which may mean that the brand will require another redesign down the road to adapt to future innovations.

The future of brand identity, especially for a versatile tech company like Google, relies on an ability to adapt and incorporate brand presence on a multi-platform level. Though the Google logo itself is not especially innovative, the interactive quality of the logo and its features lend a personality to the brand that sets it apart. — Nicole Shadowen, Head of Design and Brand Presence

Google’s new visual language is a live system, that can evolve every day at the same pace of this evolutive brand.

The mixed reviews around Google’s new image shows that brands are not just represented by their logos; brands are represented by complex brand identities. That’s why Google has created a dynamic visual language with powerful motion elements inspired by the consumer experience of interacting with the brand through various platforms. Google’s new visual language is a live system, that can evolve every day at the pace of this evolutive brand. — Elena Yepes, Digital Marketing Strategist

We’d love to know your opinions, if you agree/disagree with ours … feel free to leave a comment below or tweet to @aveyacreative to continue the conversation. Thanks for reading!