Are Christians really as pure as they seem?

Do they abstain from drinking and smoking and “treat their bodies like temples”?

Maybe. It’s not that simple…

In a recent study by the Barna Group and the American Bible Society, the 10 most Christian cities in America are Birmingham, AL; Chattanooga, TN; Tri-Cities, TN; Roanoke, VA; Shreveport, LA; Springfield, MO; Jackson, MS’ Charlotte, NC; Greenville, NC; and Little Rock, AR. Though these cities are the most religious in the country, they certainly don’t have he lowest rates of smoking. In fact, only one of the cities that made the list ranked lower that the national average for smokers in 2015, at 15.1% according to the CDC. When looking at the drinking rates for these cities, the data does prove that religious cities are well below the national average of 71% (according to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism).

graph of the percent of the population that drinks and smokes in the most religious cities, as compared to the national average
graph of the percentage of the population in the most religious cites that smokes as compared to the percentage that drinks. the only outlier is the national average of drinkers, at 71%

So in conclusion, being religious does not negatively affect smoking rates, but does affect drinking rates, at least in 2015. Christians today are not living by 1 Corinthians 6:19, which calls for all Christians to treat their “bodies as temples,” though they are doing better than the rest of the country .

graph of the percentage of the population of drinking adults
map of counties in America and their respective smoking rates

Though religiosity does not negatively affect smoking, a higher concentration of smokers live in the South, where all of the most religious cities are located. Maybe that’s the missing link for health professionals to stop the spread of smoking in the United States…

In conclusion, remember, tar streets, not your lungs, and drink responsibly.

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