A collection of resources and tools recommended by Fulbright researchers, organized by category

Written by Sejal Mistry, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar

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Photo by Ankita Dhussa, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

This article contains resources that other Fulbrighters found useful. The article organizes the resources by category with links, a short description, and comments on whether the software is free and accessible on all devices.

Writing

  • Zotero- Source tracking system where you store your sources and can easily make citations and bibliography entries. FREE, available for Mac and Windows.
  • Scrivener- Writing tool with options to share work for review, write long articles, etc. $19.99.
  • Mendeley- Software for organizing literature review materials. FREE.

Data Analysis

  • StatCrunch- Platform for doing statistic calculations without having to understand programming software. …

General background information about Fulbright researchers who responded to the survey on research and field work in India

Written by Sejal Mistry, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar

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Photo by Ankita Dhussa, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

Gender

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Breakdown of gender identify of survey respondents

Respondents for this survey were primarily female (n = 26) and male (n = 13).

Fulbright Research Category

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Breakdown of survey respondents by research category

Fulbright student researchers represent a wide variety of backgrounds and research interests. This diversity was well reflected in our survey, with 19 fields represented.

Home City

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Breakdown of survey respondents by location of home city during Fulbright research grant

A majority of Fulbright researchers were based in Urban environments (n = 29), while the minority were in semi-urban environments (n = 2), semi-rural environments (n = 4), or

Education Level

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Breakdown of survey respondents by highest level of education completed prior to their Fulbright research grant

Students from a variety of education levels participated in the survey. A majority of participants were PhD students, followed by Undergraduates and Masters students.

Length of Grant

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Breakdown of survey respondents by length of Fulbright research grant

Fulbrighters are expected to remain in India for the full duration of their grant (9 months for research and and addition 3 months for CLEA). As indicated in the 2018 grant documents, students are required to remain in their host country for a minimum of 6 months.

Recommendations for Transportation and Accommodation for Women Traveling in/to the Field

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Photo by Lilianna Bagnoli, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

This article provides an overview of recommendations related to transportation and accommodation for women while traveling in/to the field. As women, we navigate professional spaces and identities wherever we go — be it in the United States or India — and consider the safety of transportation and accommodation in all contexts. …

Most Fulbright researchers had at least one field work team member. This article summarizes which individuals are typically on these teams and suggestions for effectively managing teams in the field.

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Photo by Lilianna Bagnoli, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

Composition of Field Work Teams

80% of respondents traveled with at least one other person during their field work. Depending on the nature of the project, researchers were accompanied by a variety of individuals including local individuals, translators, and research assistants. The table below provides a snapshot of the most common team members Fulbright researchers worked with during their field work.

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Survey responses from the past four cohorts of Fulbright researchers in India. The majority of researchers traveled with a translator or local individual during their field work.

Creating a Field Work Team

Fulbright researchers recommend putting a lot of thought into the individual(s) who will be a part of your field work team. When thinking about who should be on your field work team, one respondent suggested that researchers, “Think about the necessities for your study and what will cause minimal distractions in the environment you are going with.” …

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Photo by Lilianna Bagnoli, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

This post provides an idea of the costs involved with research-related services you may avail during your research grant. Services covered include translation, transcription, and research assistants.

Translation Services

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Survey responses from the past four cohorts of Fulbright researchers in India. The majority of researchers used translation services in person.

About half of all Fulbright researchers used translation services (48.7%), while those who did use translation services were most likely to use them in person (85%). The remaining 15% of researchers used paper-based translation services. 63% of respondents using a translator said that their translation activities took place in the field, while the remaining respondents were about evenly split between translation activities taking place in a local community or in an office setting.

Finding a Translator

Of those researchers who used a translator, 58% said that they identified their translator through a personal connection. …

This article discusses some of the different definitions of field work, tips for preparing for field visits, and advice about balancing time in the field with other research activities.

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Photo by Lilianna Bagnoli, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

What is Field Work?

The definition of field work varies from project to project. While each field experience is unique and yours may not align exactly with previous researchers, the list below provides an idea of how respondents described field work during their Fulbright grant:

  • In-person interviews with respondents either at their home, work, or at a community event such as an NGO event (both individual and group interviews)
  • In-person observations of organizations or research…
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Photo by Lilianna Bagnoli, 2017–18 Fulbright-Nehru Research Scholar, New Delhi

This publication was written by a group of former Fulbright researchers (see this article for general background information about the survey respondents). Each of the articles are based on reflections from Fulbright researchers about their experiences doing research and field work in India.

Who wrote this publication?

Each year, several U.S. citizens receive government-funded grants through the Fulbright Program to carry out research projects around the world, with many of them taking place in India. This publication was written by former Fulbright research grant recipients whose research and field work took place in India during the time period of 2015–2018.

Where does the data come from?

Fulbright research projects in India span diverse geographies, sectors, topics, and methodologies. Over time, researchers have gathered a lot of information about the opportunities, logistics, and challenges of doing research and field work in India. In an attempt to capture their collective knowledge, a detailed survey was distributed to the past four cohorts of Fulbright researchers in India. 39 researchers responded to the survey. This blog attempts to summarize the insights of those researchers both for future Fulbright researchers and for others doing research and field work in India. While the topics covered aren’t exhaustive, we hope that they will serve as a helpful starting point for those planning or in the midst of their own research endeavors. …

About

Lilianna Bagnoli

Data analyst/mobile applications designer/researcher who’s passionate about using data and technology for social impact.

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