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New York Yankees’ manager, Joe Girardi told Jared Diamond of the Wall Street Journal that he would ban infield shifts if he were the commissioner.

Joe Girardi said if he were commissioner, he’d ban infield shifts. So, that’s something that transpired today.
— Jared Diamond (@jareddiamond) April 26, 2016

Diamond pointed out that the rulebook was very clear that the pitcher and catcher are the only players who can’t move from their predetermined position.

Straight from the MLB rulebook. It’s been this way forever. The only “real” positions are P and C. http://pic.twitter.com/y9ssjLjwbs
— Jared Diamond (@jareddiamond) April 26, 2016

According to FanGraphs’ new shift data, the Yankees have been shifted against the sixth most among MLB teams and have the 17th worst wRC+ when shifted on.

Ken Rosenthal of FOX Sports recently posted current shift data that showed the Yankees eighth among MLB teams in shift percentage at 26.3 percent. The Houston Astros lead the majors at 41 percent while only six teams are below ten percent.

And here, from STATS LLC, is team-by-team shift data through Saturday. My apologies to all for any inconvenience. http://pic.twitter.com/QRrA5hqKaZ
— Ken Rosenthal (@Ken_Rosenthal) April 25, 2016

Girardi also told Diamond that the second base bag should be somewhat of a divider between the four infielders. Presumably two infielders on each side.

I asked him (with a little too much snark, I fear), and he said second base would be divider for 2B and SS. https://t.co/ZbSHEiNFsu
— Jared Diamond (@jareddiamond) April 26, 2016

It is clear that infield shifts are here to stay and changing the rule to benefit hitters would be similar to banning change-ups or curveballs because they’re more difficult to hit. Let’s take a moment to be grateful that Girardi is not the commissioner and that we will soon (maybe) see exaggerated outfield defenses in the near future.

The post Joe Girardi Would Ban the Infield Shift appeared first on Baseball Essential.

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