Can Tinder make it easy to ‘stalk’ people?

It’s all about the information that you share.

When my girlfriend and I broke up last summer I decided that I would give Tinder a try. I heard a lot about it and was curious. And who knows? Maybe I will find my soulmate there!

It took me more than 2 weeks before I swiped to the right

I really liked the idea that you can like a person on Tinder, but they cannot see it until they like you back and you are a match in the Tinder heavens. Less chance of awkward situations where you declare your interest in someone who has no interest in you. Still new to the digital/online dating scene, it took me more than 2 weeks after I signed up before I dared to swipe to the right for the first time.

On Tinder I found people I knew vaguely via mutual friends from back when I was 16 or something, also a few I knew because of my jobs and even someone from my highschool (yep, instant liked that one!). I don’t live in a very big city and I don’t want to travel to the other side of the country to meet someone. So it didn’t take long for Tinder to tell me there were no more new people available near me. And I had to wait quite often for Tinder to find ‘new’ people near me. Or serve me a bunch of people which I already nope’d (this happens a lot).

I also can’t say I am very successfull at this Tinder swiping. In all my time on Tinder I had just a few matches of which one was just spam for a porn or dating site and an other one unmatched me within a day before I even had the change to start a conversation. Not a very impressive score for about 4 months on Tinder. But you only need 1 real match, right?

Is it easy to find more information about someone?

Tinder did make me wonder how easy it would be to find more information about people besides the little info and the few pictures they shared on their profile. Without hacking or something like that. Just with the power of the mighty interwebz and what people choose to share on it.


First of all, everybody on Tinder has a Facebook profile, because you need one to create an account on Tinder and it is where Tinder fetches your pictures from. Also, Tinder shows when you have a shared contact with a person on Tinder.

With 1 of my matches I had a shared contact. So I went to Facebook and found my match between the contacts of our mutual friend, with her full name and more pictures and information about her. This literally took less than 2 minutes (I had to scroll through all the contacts because I’m dumb and didn’t realize you can easily search on a name in the contacts of your friends).

Another one of my Tinder-matches shared her school on her Tinder profile. I went to Facebook to look for the school, found it but couldn’t find her (or not quick enough). So I went to Google and a quick search on her name in combination with the school name returned about 6 LinkedIn profiles, and yes, one of them was her. With her full name I also found her Facebook profile with loads of other pictures and more information. So it took me about 5 minutes to find her full name and a lot more information than she probably wanted to share with the strangers on Tinder.

With one other match I just went straight to Google and searched for her first name and place of work and found her full name and Facebook profile with a lot more information and pictures just within a few minutes.

So yes, it is quite easy to find more information online about your Tinder matches.

All these searches took me less than 5 minutes. And I didn’t even go full-stalker and tried Google Image Search or something.

With just one of my matches I did find her Facebook profile and full name, but couldn’t find more pictures or information because she didn’t had anything shared publicly on her profile (smart girl!).


So yeah, if you don’t want strangers to know a lot about you, don’t share your school or workplace on Tinder and keep your profiles on social media sites like Facebook private and only share stuff with your contacts.

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