Interview Transcripts and Its Implications

Interview Transcript from the Expert

Questions about Experience

QUESTION 1: Tell me a little bit about yourself and your current work setting.

ANSWER: Hi, my name is Kim Baraquel. I have been working for four years already t Canopy Center. I am a speech pathologist. What I do is a one on one therapy with children with problem in speech and communication.

QUESTION 2: What prompted you to want a career in speech language pathology?

ANSWER: My sister actually suggested this course, so I took it. My first choice in UP Manila was nursing but I didn’t pass it. I passed in speech pathologist, so I just pursue the course.

QUESTION 3: What is a common misconception people have about what you do?

ANSWER: Common misconception is that, we speech pathologists are doctors, which are not true. I’m just a therapist and not a doctor.

QUESTION 4: What is most challenging about what you do?

ANSWER: The most challenging part about this job is that, my patience is tested. As what my co- worker says, the essence why patients, are called such because you need a tremendous patience to them. Also, it’s really physically and mentally exhausting because you’ll have to think through with every patient like what to do with them the goals, the management, everything, the strategies, and everything. Moreover, it is physically exhausting especially if the patients are big and then likes to move around so I need to manage the child’s behavior.

QUESTION 5: What is most rewarding about what you do?

ANSWER: The most rewarding is that you’d get to see the parents happy about the improvements in their child. And also when you see your kids, when I see my kids improving in the first day that I handle them. For example I have a patience for six months, and I see them improving, it is really, really rewarding.

Kim Baraquel

Questions about Theory

QUESTION 1: Who are your students/patience?

ANSWER: Usually my students are those age ranging from 1–9 years old. Their diagnosis are usually autism, down syndromes, we also have patients with hearing impairment, with global developmental delay.

QUESTION 2: What’s your philosophy for serving the students?

ANSWER: My philosophy is that ‘Improvement should start at home’. It’s that yes I am a therapist, I treat my patients but for the parents to expect big improvements, they should be really the one who will demonstrate change at home. They are the one who should initiate communication with their children, who should learn to stimulate the use of the language so that they will talk and really communicate with them.

QUESTION 2: What are the most important things you think parents need to know about language to make a difference for children?

ANSWER: Parents should know that language starts not when the baby begin to talk but language starts immediately after the mother has given birth to the baby. You can actually start the language there. And it is better to teach children at a young age to appreciate their surrounding even if they can’t talk yet. Parents need to know and tell to the child what the things are called, let them identify label and signs as well as the color. Everything that the child sees. Parents should know that language stimulation is really, really effective and has a big effect in the improvement of the child.

QUESTION 3: What are the most important things you think teachers need to know about language to make a difference for children?

ANSWER: Teachers should recognize that they have a big role in homing the language of the students since most of the time, this children are with their teachers at school. Thus a need to maximize how to use the language is very important. Teachers can make use of drill and repetitions as well as integrate game-based learning in the lesson to let the students have fun while learning the language.

QUESTION 4: What do you think is the gap for minority disabled students that you serve to the abled one.

ANSWER: The gap I guess settles on the issue somewhere in the brain. I remember my professor says that everything is neurological. These kids, he kids that I am teaching are cognitively challenged and it’s because of their structure of their brain. I think it stats it there. Also aside from that, that is external, one factor is the environment. If for example a child who is autism is cognitively challenge, then his or her parents are not doing something about it the more that, that child is not communicating very well in his or her surroundings. And, that’s the gap itself.

QUESTION 5: What model /social skills or strategies do you use to serve to your students?

ANSWER: What I do is that I use layman’s terms. I don’t use highfaluting words when I teach. For example, the parents of my children, I use language that they would understand. Also I emphasize to them the need to teach the child at home and when teaching or coaching for example like SPED teachers ask them first about what they do with the students or if I have a common student, I ask them first what they do and I respond, I collaborate. Another factor is the relationship. You’ll have to build to each other the essence of trust, understanding, patience and then connect with them so that you can target the goals for the child.

QUESTION 6: Is it possible to cater the students with disabilities in a regular classroom?

ANSWER: Yes it is very possible. I bet that is already made possible through inclusion or mainstreaming. However, the challenge is if the teacher can handle the child along with the large number of normal students. I think it is really the challenge but if the question is about being combined all together, yes they can be included.

QUESTION 7: What is the best advice you could give for parents with children with speech difficulties and teachers handling students with these problem?

ANSWER: The best advice that I can give is by being pro-active. By being pro-active, it means that once they discover their child is different, say for example, autism or Down syndrome, they need to be pro-active about it to see the strength of the child. Because these children, though they are considered different, they have skills and potentials which they need to unravel and discover. Also they need to stop comparing their children to other children because every child is unique. They have to learn and discover the uniqueness of every child to bring out their potential. Moreover, collaboration is a key especially to student, parent, teachers and even the administration to see the improvements and the changes that had been occurring to the child, and the common goal with in sync to the target goals that they are pursuing.

Interview Transcript from the Students

Note: We have interviewed ten students to get their opinion but we will be only transcribing four answers from the students since some of their answers deliver the same message from the others.

Question: What do you think are the point of view of students in an inclusive classroom?

Student 1: I guess one frustration is when this disabled individuals cannot participate fully in some activities in school and they see their classmates doing it.

Students 2: I think they are frustrated when this students cannot get the attention they need especially when they look at their condition.

Students 3: I think the frustration of students with special needs lies on the fact that some facilities in schools only caters those of the normal students.

Students 4: I think the frustration of students with disabilities like in ours, is that they have trouble fitting in. They cannot easily cope with the surroundings and such accommodation takes a lot of time depending on the participation of the people surrounding them.

Interview with the PWD’s Parents or Yaya

Interview with the parents or yaya were not allowed to be video nor recorded. However, we are allowed to share some of the contents that we have remembered that they have answered during the interview.

Note: Details or information of the interviewees were not published to comply on the confidentiality as requested by the interviewees. Good thing that our group was allowed to put some of the selected contents of the interview in a video where the interviewee would remain unknown.

Write-up: Our group decided to make a video out of the interviews that we made.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iYpUmWakJ78

NOTE: The video contains clips that were retrieved from the youtube. Also the people that had been interviewed were asked for their permission to publicized it.

Understanding Disability & Their Frustrations in an Inclusive Education

With our main goal of understanding disability and their frustrations in an inclusive education, we have made our small research through the internet and the interviews that we made from the expert, the normal students and persons with disabilities. Long before, we have been informed with the rights of persons with disabilities, but through the subject, Differentiated Instruction, our group was able to get a clearer and more plausible explanation on how we look at these persons and how we treat them.

Among all the important concept and ideas that we learned from the subject, what had stricken as the most is the word, RECOGNIZE.

The following are cited from the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

Recognizing that the United Nations, in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and in the International Covenants on Human Rights, has proclaimed and agreed that everyone is entitled to all the rights and freedoms set forth therein, without distinction of any kind

Recognizing that disability is an evolving concept and that disability results from the interaction between persons with impairments and attitudinal and environmental barriers that hinders their full and effective participation in society on an equal basis with others,

Recognizing the importance of international cooperation for improving the living conditions of persons with disabilities in every country, particularly in developing countries,

Recognizing the need to promote and protect the human rights of all persons with disabilities, including those who require more intensive support,

There are too many things to recognize. To recognize their roles in the social, political and the educational system are just some of the few things being mentioned. However, the real question lies on whether we have recognized fully and accepted all their needs and whether we have done something to make a change, at least. Yes, there are laws supporting these individuals to be part of the regular curriculum, such as the implementation of inclusive education, but the real question is that, have we gotten their point of view regarding this matter? Have we recognized what system they want in an educational setting? Have we asked if they are satisfied with the services that had been provided to them in an inclusive education? Have we asked about their frustrations in a regular classroom where we thought they get the essence of being included? Have we thought of these actions if these are already sufficient enough?

These are just some of the questions that keep on bugging in our minds. Recognizing the needs of persons with disabilities can make a big difference but putting in so much effort and truly making a move to help them is of prior importance. In a research that we have read entitled, SHUT OUT: The Experience of People with Disabilities and their Families in Australia conducted by the Commonwealth of Australia, the researchers recognized social exclusion and discrimination and lack of services and support as the prevalent problems frequently experienced by persons with disabilities which we can evidently see in education. In our interviews with students regarding their point of view about the inclusive classroom that we have now, a student said that “I think the frustration of students with disabilities like in ours, is that they have trouble fitting in. They cannot easily cope with the surroundings and such accommodation takes a lot of time depending on the participation of the people surrounding them”.

In education, though we have this so called, inclusive education, we cannot say that it really master its purpose at all. Yes, inclusive education helps. But do our efforts really fill in the gaps? If we will notice, one frustration is that the facilities itself. Have we not thought of designing a school landscape that can cater both able and disabled students? Have we not thought of extending the natural environment of the school for these individuals? Have we not thought that we should start including them through letting them not only feel the belonging but greater than that, that is to truly belong? What about our teachers? Have they recognized fully the needs of their students inside the classroom?

School is very important to persons with disabilities and parents together with the teachers create the biggest role in helping these children with disabilities. In this very moment, it is already a need for teachers and future teachers to be well informed to handle their students with disabilities well. This is not an easy task and though teachers are already hands-on with their students most of the time, it is not a bad thing to receive an advice from another person who cares for these children just like they do. The best advice the speech pathologist gave for both teachers and parents is to be pro-active. She said that “By being pro-active, it means that once they discover their child is different, say for example, autism or Down syndrome, they need to be pro-active about it to see the strength of the child. Because these children, though they are considered different, they have skills and potentials which they need to unravel and discover. Also they need to stop comparing their children to other children because every child is unique. They have to learn and discover the uniqueness of every child to bring out their potential. Moreover, collaboration is a key especially to student, parent, teachers and even the administration to see the improvements and the changes that had been occurring to the child and the common goal with in sync to the target goals that they are pursuing.”

Thus, with this, every one of us should realize that disability is not the problem and people should not pity persons with disabilities. Instead, let us make the society be aware that it is the society that is the problem itself. Society should not look down with persons with disabilities. The society must work hard to stop the long practice of discrimination toward these people. Every one of us is unique and we all have our strengths and weaknesses. Normal or with disability, each and everyone deserves the right to live peacefully and to be provided with basic needs. Persons with disabilities do not want to be treated special. They should not feel that they have to fit in and neither do normal people have the right to make them feel that way. They want to be treated with equality just like everybody else. If normal people need help and support for them to function effectively, so do people with disabilities. If for a normal person, stairs is needed to be able to go upstairs, then so do people with disabilities need a ramp. Let us keep in our minds that we can contribute in a little way of helping them survive in this harsh world and the first thing to do is to recognize, accept, then make a move. More importantly, let us take this philosophy that our speech pathologist live by, by heart, “Improvement should start at home”. Teachers and parents should put their best efforts forward together with the children and the whole of society. We have to realize that we are in a team and every little change should start within our homes. This is not an easy change. It truly takes a long journey to success, but let me leave a friendly reminder to keep all of us moving forward: We are all in this together and each and every step we make makes a difference.

Prof. Sarah Palma

Professor

3-III BEE SHS

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