22 months writing image descriptions: 4 awesome side-effects / resources & explanation of the need

  1. I notice things more. When I write an image description, I have to really look at the image multiple times, and most of the time I realize aspects that before I would never have brought to my consciousness. In this way I get to look at it for the first time twice. It’s a great mind-sensation. This used to happen for me when I edited photos I took, but now I can have it for any image whether I created it or not.
  2. I’ve grown far better skill at describing things. I have to figure out what is important for meaning and feeling, and put that into words. I have come to be much more aware of lighting, textures, and mood.
  3. I am more intentional in what I share of both my own and others’ images. There is a bit more work to sharing things, so I don’t just click ‘share’ on any image I come across that I like. Instead, my feed ends up being weighted toward original content. I value creation deeply and am grateful that that little bit of extra work keeps me from ever getting in the habit of merely re-sharing others’ content.
  4. It has made me more expressive. Rather than popping in an emoticon, I have resurrected the art of emoting: I will type *smiles* or *excited bouncing* and this is oddly far more vulnerable and makes me feel far more connected.

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writes on social justice; intersectionality; feminism; being queer, trans, genderfree, polyamorous, fat, naked, vegetarian, honest&open, a tree-hugger, & magic

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belenen

belenen

writes on social justice; intersectionality; feminism; being queer, trans, genderfree, polyamorous, fat, naked, vegetarian, honest&open, a tree-hugger, & magic

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