Beth, what is a “fake news site” but a news sight that ‘you’ do not agree with.
Z Man
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Fake news sites are sites that exist solely to make money on making up news, here is an article that explains this highly profitable business:

“Some of his Trump stories are true, some are highly slanted and others are totally false, like one this summer reporting that “the Mexican government announced they will close their borders to Americans in the event that Donald Trump is elected President of the United States.” Data compiled by Buzzfeed showed that the story was the third most-trafficked fake story on Facebook from May to July.” http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/25/world/europe/fake-news-donald-trump-hillary-clinton-georgia.html

Here is a list of sites that have been proven to fabricate news stories:

“Below is a list of fake, false, regularly misleading, and otherwise questionable ‘news’ organizations that are commonly shared on Facebook and other social media sites,” Zimdars explains. “Many of these websites rely on ‘outrage’ by using distorted headlines and decontextualized or dubious information in order to generate likes, shares, and profits.” http://nymag.com/selectall/2016/11/fake-facebook-news-sites-to-avoid.html

http://www.usnews.com/news/national-news/articles/2016-11-14/avoid-these-fake-news-sites-at-all-costs

“For example, the top Google news link for “final election results” on Monday was from a fake-news site called “70 News” which “reported” that Donald Trump had won both the electoral and popular vote. As the Washington Post points out, that’s simply not true.

Complicating matters are the plethora of left- and right-leaning propaganda sites out there, deliberately spreading misinformation in order to appeal to certain groups. Satire sites like The Onion and The Borowitz Report are one thing; sites that promote hoaxes for click-bait or play to people’s deepest fears are quite another.

“Fake facts circulate on social media to a frightening extent… There is now a whole cottage industry specializing in hyper-partisan, sometimes wildly distorted clickbait,” Oliver explained.”

Maureen Dowd is an opinion columnist for the New York Times. What she said to Couric was her opinion, not a fact.

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