Demystifying how to be a male ally

It’s happened to many of us. We want to show our support for diversity, but say the wrong thing. Or write a quick message, using gendered language by mistake. Or speak up when we should just listen.

We want to work in environments where everyone feels welcome. Where people of all genders and cultures and life experiences can thrive. We want to help create this culture.

We may be getting pressure from our board or the C-suite to track and improve diversity numbers. Regardless, we want to support women and underrepresented minorities because it feels like the right thing to do.

We’re also aware that diverse teams create more innovative solutions and better financial success.

Yet being an ally is often complicated and even bewildering. Is it okay for a guy to attend a women’s conference or networking event? Can I invite a co-worker of the opposite sex to dinner during business travel? How should we describe our company’s diversity activities without sounding like it’s a checklist to make everyone feel better? The list goes on.

To help navigate these challenges, check out our @betterallies Twitter feed.

Our goal is to tweet everyday actions you can take to be a better ally in the workplace. We review research and publications for actionable steps. We amplify what others are doing. And we reflect on the missteps we’ve made and pledge to do better. Here’s a sampling of some recent Tweets:

Want more? Join the conversation by following @betterallies and sharing what’s working for you as an ally. Ask questions. Retweet what resonates with you.

We think we’re doing good work, but you don’t need to believe us. Here’s what others have said:


Becoming an ally is a journey. Want to join us? Check out @betterallies on Twitter. Follow our Medium channel. Subscribe to our newsletter. Find us on Instagram or our brand new Pinterest board. Tell someone about these resources. Together, we can — and will — make a difference.