Let’s explore why our doctors sometimes fail in their goal to “do no harm.”

Photo by Online Marketing on Unsplash

You might think you approach the world objectively — but you don’t. We all see the world through a subjective lens. Our lived experiences, culture, and education form our mindsets. And this includes the people who oversee our healthcare.

I have an intimate relationship with doctor’s offices due to living with several chronic illnesses. After learning about how bias impacts my treatment, I’ve started to become a better communicator with my medical providers. Yes, I feel more empowered as a self-advocate. I’m also starting to understand how I can break through the biases and move forward productively.

Of course, people with…


Trying to stay afloat during the pandemic.

Photo by Tim Mossholder on Unsplash

This fact would probably surprise anyone who knows me — but I absolutely hated couples therapy. I love to talk out my issues, and dive deep into learning about how to improve my mental health. But doing it with the person I love the most? I shudder now even at the thought.

I dreaded the session every week, and left each session feeling frustrated — sometimes even angry. The therapist behaved with kindness and respect. However, we only attended for a few sessions before we realized it wasn’t going to work for our lifestyle. …


Exploring how empathy can lead to more productive online conversations with the people closest to you.

Photo by Chris Sabor on Unsplash

Let’s set one thing straight: I’m not here to invalidate your anger. This article won’t be a plea for civility, with the goal to push aside marginalized voices. I fully believe that public outrage can be appropriate.

When facing injustice and oppression, anger becomes absolutely necessary as a tool for change. It sways public opinion and leads to new institutional policies.

I personally experience rage daily over other people’s harmful behaviour. As a woman, a Jew, and someone living with several complicated chronic illnesses, I encounter ignorance daily.

We need criticism to spark action. And when people mess up, they…


A glimpse into the mystical world of twins

My sister and I, 10 years old, wearing our cheerleading uniforms at a football game.

Right after I crossed the finish line — exhausted, overheated, and proud — as I completed my first five kilometre run, I wanted to share the news with her immediately. She already knew my time, and had been tracking my progress online.

My apartment recently flooded, less than two weeks after I had surgery. We were on the phone together within mere minutes after the 4 a.m. discovery, so that she could provide her calm reassurance.

When my partner and I got engaged in March 2019, I started dialing her number basically seconds after I said “Yes!”

I just couldn’t…


Photo by John Mark Arnold on Unsplash

Even though the act of tidying is nothing new, the topic of decluttering has become extraordinarily popular — and profitable — in recent years. Many resourceful entrepreneurs have created books, podcasts, television shows, YouTube videos, products, and services to help us get decluttering right. People can easily dismiss this seemingly-trendy movement because frequently, we only discuss the concept superficially. Many decluttering advocates don’t take the time to address different needs and life experiences, instead often offering one-size-fits-all approaches. Yet decluttering actually does provide significant and tangible benefits when approached with intention and nuance.

“Under the influence of clutter, we may…


Source: Pixabay. Graffiti street art depicting a busy road full of vehicles and pedestrians.

A complex debate has sparked in the middle of this collective pandemic experience — which jobs, which people and which contributions are considered essential to society?

I live in Toronto — a major Canadian city. My federal government defines essential workers as those who are “considered critical to preserving life, health and basic societal functioning.” In the current climate, this designation dictates which businesses can remain open and which employees should still leave their homes for work. These measures are being put into place to reduce the spread of COVID-19 and to try to help flatten the curve.

The power of one word

Language has…


Image: Pixabay. Hot pink background with conversation bubbles.

“At least you have a child.” “Well, it’s good you can work from home.” “Other people would kill to have your life.” “It could be worse.” “Don’t worry about it.” “You’re overreacting.” “You’ll live.” “Suck it up.” “Stop being so negative.”

We all view the world through the lens of our own experiences, which can hinder our compassion. We may not be able to relate to others. When someone divulges their struggles, we may feel resentful or believe their worries are trivial. Sharing these judgmental thoughts with that person though is cruel, and will impact your relationship. …


A side table stacked with books and a turquoise lamp, and a glimpse of my bed with a navy pillow case and salmon comforter.
A side table stacked with books and a turquoise lamp, and a glimpse of my bed with a navy pillow case and salmon comforter.

In March, it felt like the whole world quickly and irreversibly changed — while also in some ways remaining exactly the same. It’s a terrifying time for basically everyone, but it is also beautiful to see communities working together to try to keep each other safe, healthy and happy. With the coronavirus pandemic ramping up worldwide, people everywhere are now practising social distancing to try to flatten the curve. Staying home is a new experience for most people and it’s been challenging for them to adjust, both practically and emotionally.

For myself, the past few weeks have been overwhelming for…

Bev Late

Healthcare advocate & communications professional. Exploring well-being, creativity, and community. www.instagram.com/unwellunlimitedly

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store