Deleting Crappy Draft Posts

In the cold light of morning, I just deleted three draft blog posts that I wrote last night during a bout of insomnia.

Their titles are telling about what was on my mind at 1am in the morning.

  • SaaS + Transaction Fees
  • Games Are a Hits Business, But B2B SaaS Is A Grind
  • The B2B SaaS MRR Funding Dead Zone

I usually write posts in real time (like this one). I don’t have a lot of drafts stored up nor do I spent a lot of time editing and trying to get the posts just right. Instead, I use my posts to think out loud as I play with ideas, explore my thoughts, or just write what is on my mind. I generally do one edit pass after I’ve written the post and then hit publish.

When I have a thought that occurs to me during the day and don’t have time to write a post, I toss a title into my WordPress Drafts folder and add bullet points on what is in my mind to the body of the post. Each of the three posts above were in my WordPress Draft folder (which had 18 this morning and now has 15) which accumulated over the past two months. The number ebbs and flows as I use a draft about once a week to stimulate a post.

I jammed through all three of these last night — it was probably an hour of writing. I just read through them to see what I had written. I found a bowl of illogical word soup mixed with random crap. While there were plenty of interesting thoughts, the sum total of them was a giant pile of incoherence.

I started rewriting SaaS + Transaction Fees and then got bored. I realized it’d be better to just delete the crap and start over some time in the future when the urge to write about this hit me again.

Over the last twelve years of blogging I’ve deleted many draft posts. When I think about the books I’ve written, it probably takes 150,000–200,000 words to get a 50,000 page book. Highlighting something and hitting Cmd-X is second nature.

I often get asked how I write so much. As any writer knows, the answer is to write a lot more than you actually publish. Accepting that part of the process of writing is deleting a lot of what you write is soothing, at least to me.


Originally published at Feld Thoughts.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.