Applications for Speech Impaired

Speech impairment affects people in the way they create sounds to form words. Some of the most common forms of impairment are stuttering, apraxia, and dysarthria. Affected people are not able to say what they want to say even though they are fully aware of what they need.

This becomes a major problem for most people as they cannot communicate freely. Luckily, the digital world has made it easy for speech impaired people to communicate with others. Here are some of the used apps for those affected.

Vaakya — ACC App

Another important app for the speech impaired people is the Vaakya — augmentative and alternate communication app. It is a photo based app that is designed to assist people with speech problems. Individuals with speech problems arising from aphasia, strokes or MND/ALS can use the app. Similarly, people suffering from cerebral palsy, autism and other mental related problems can take advantage of the app.

Talkitt App

This is an essential app for people with speech, language, and motor disorders. It is “speech to speech” app that gives disabled people the freedom to express themselves naturally. This is made possible by letting them use their voice to communicate. It can recognize speech patterns and translate into words that are understandable.

Talkitt can translate unintelligible pronunciation to perfect sentences with high accuracy. Also, the app can work in almost any spectrum of speech impairment severity from mild to severe. What’s more, the app can translate the user’s speech to any language. The apple is compatible with both iOS and on Android.

Touch Voice App

This app has been designed to address problems faced by people with various medical conditions such as brain tumors, selective mutism, brain injury, Parkinson’s and others. It is always a struggle for both the listener and the speaker having speech impairment problems. The app is designed to articulate their needs and to feel quickly and thus reducing their stress levels ultimately leading them to a comfortable life.

The app also uses AAC to allow speech impaired people to communicate via voice synthesis through clicking of buttons and photos. The app can be downloaded on Android and iOS platforms. There is also an optional web based app that users can use.

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