Just a Book Review 1 (Hi! Green at this! First post here…HELP! How do I know where to post this to? I put it under Review … which I’m sure is incorrect. I can’t find this post anywhere. Let me know?)

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A bokor, or sorcerer, showed him his freshly dug grave. Tears streamed down his face as a pole bent the upper half of his body back. Someone held his head by his hair, while another beat his face. The pain was unbearable. He tasted his own blood. The drums synchronized and reached deafening levels. He could feel hell itself when the blood drinking mambo, or priestess, inserted the powder into his open wounds. Weak and fading fast, he was unable to speak or move. He heard them nailing the lid on his coffin and dirt falling. He was glad he knew God. Shortly after, he no longer existed.
Poison Makers, Jimmy Olsen’s Adult Murder/Mystery, is so much more than the genre’s normal consistence.
A unique blend of several genres, Poison Makers is worthy of recommendation to all.
Olsen is a fantastic storyteller, with meticulously created characters. His facts about the dynamics of voodoo and zombies seem irrefutable. Outside of research for Poison Makers, Jimmy lived a number of years in the Caribbean, making a home on the island of Hispaniola.
Jimmy’s story reveals evidence of the ancient human plague, voodoo, how it can be contracted and that it has nearly no cure. Everyone in Haiti knows of someone who believes in the African dark magic mixed with Catholicism, called Voodoo or Vodoun.
The novel, Poison Makers, begins with it’s first death.
The President of the United States appointed Marine Veteran, Adam Quist, as the U.S. Ambassador to the Dominican Republic. One day, Quist died, face down on his desk. With his history of a mild heart condition, the doctor signed the papers with no autopsy. Cause of death, heart attack.
Garrett Yancy’s, travel agency, was located in the town of Santo Domingo. Yancy did more than make travel arrangements. He was a well connected businessman and entrepreneur. People trusted Yancy. Rare opportunities presented themselves and Yancy was often able to provide a service. A private client retained him, to uncover the truth of Quist’s death. Yancy called upon a reliable associate to assist him, Mr. Edgar Espinosa-Jones, EJ for short.
EJ was young and stunning and reflected everything that people found exotic in Latin men. He attended higher education in the U.S., and grew up with impeccable job ethics from his father, a Dominican tobacco farmer. Clever, with a casual persona and smile, makes EJ believable and enchanting. Fluent in English and Caribbean Dialects, EJ has his own credible connections that allow him access that others didn’t have.
Yancy’s secret client provided a letter of warning regarding personal safety, a sealed manilla envelope and a large sum of cash. Yancy spoke of his concerns to EJ, like a father to a son. He offered his advice about the dark magic and clasped EJ’s, hands, in his own. Before closing the meeting, Yancy gave instructions for EJ to meet with Quist’s daughter, Olivia. She would be able to answer some questions and offer more details. Given the place and time, EJ asked how he’d find this woman. Yancy said that wouldn’t be necessary, as Olivia had been given a picture of him. Oliva and EJ are in for a ride and the shock of a lifetime.
Olsen expresses the graphic lifestyles of the different layers of daily life in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. As Americans, we have no concept of the livelihood or lifestyle of these beautiful and enduring people. The people and culture are continents away from our own. Their beliefs have ancient roots all over the world including the U.S.

A bokor, or sorcerer, showed him his freshly dug grave. Tears streamed down his face as a pole bent the upper half of his body back. Someone held his head by his hair, while another beat his face. The pain was unbearable. He tasted his own blood. The drums synchronized and reached deafening levels. He could feel hell itself when the blood drinking mambo, or priestess, inserted the powder into his open wounds. Weak and fading fast, he was unable to speak or move. He heard them nailing the lid on his coffin and dirt falling. He was glad he knew God. Shortly after, he no longer existed.
Poison Makers, Jimmy Olsen’s Adult Murder/Mystery, is so much more than the genre’s normal consistence.
A unique blend of several genres, Poison Makers is worthy of recommendation to all.
Olsen is a fantastic storyteller, with meticulously created characters. His facts about the dynamics of voodoo and zombies seem irrefutable. Outside of research for Poison Makers, Jimmy lived a number of years in the Caribbean, making a home on the island of Hispaniola.
Jimmy’s story reveals evidence of the ancient human plague, voodoo, how it can be contracted and that it has nearly no cure. Everyone in Haiti knows of someone who believes in the African dark magic mixed with Catholicism, called Voodoo or Vodoun.
The novel, Poison Makers, begins with it’s first death.
The President of the United States appointed Marine Veteran, Adam Quist, as the U.S. Ambassador to the Dominican Republic. One day, Quist died, face down on his desk. With his history of a mild heart condition, the doctor signed the papers with no autopsy. Cause of death, heart attack.
Garrett Yancy’s, travel agency, was located in the town of Santo Domingo. Yancy did more than make travel arrangements. He was a well connected businessman and entrepreneur. People trusted Yancy. Rare opportunities presented themselves and Yancy was often able to provide a service. A private client retained him, to uncover the truth of Quist’s death. Yancy called upon a reliable associate to assist him, Mr. Edgar Espinosa-Jones, EJ for short.
EJ was young and stunning and reflected everything that people found exotic in Latin men. He attended higher education in the U.S., and grew up with impeccable job ethics from his father, a Dominican tobacco farmer. Clever, with a casual persona and smile, makes EJ believable and enchanting. Fluent in English and Caribbean Dialects, EJ has his own credible connections that allow him access that others didn’t have.
Yancy’s secret client provided a letter of warning regarding personal safety, a sealed manilla envelope and a large sum of cash. Yancy spoke of his concerns to EJ, like a father to a son. He offered his advice about the dark magic and clasped EJ’s, hands, in his own. Before closing the meeting, Yancy gave instructions for EJ to meet with Quist’s daughter, Olivia. She would be able to answer some questions and offer more details. Given the place and time, EJ asked how he’d find this woman. Yancy said that wouldn’t be necessary, as Olivia had been given a picture of him. Oliva and EJ are in for a ride and the shock of a lifetime.
Olsen expresses the graphic lifestyles of the different layers of daily life in Haiti and the Dominican Republic. As Americans, we have no concept of the livelihood or lifestyle of these beautiful and enduring people. The people and culture are continents away from our own. Their beliefs have ancient roots all over the world including the U.S.