KD’s torn achilles’ is unforgivable, but it’s far from surprising

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Photo by TJ Dragotta on Unsplash

What happened to Kevin Durant last night was an absolute travesty and there are many ways to divvy up blame for the career threatening injury he sustained. But first, let us set the context, shall we?

After the end of the NBA regular season and for the better part of these ongoing NBA playoffs, Kevin Durant was all but crowned the greatest basketball player on earth. …


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What does it mean to be an embodied subject engaging in a virtual space? This is the question posed by artist Mendi and Keith Obadike in an art installation aptly titled Blackness for Sale.

On August 8, 2001, Keith Obadike placed an ad on eBay attempting to auction off his Blackness. It was one of the first internet postings to go viral, but within four days eBay took the auction down citing its “inappropriateness”. It was the Obadike’s aim to address the many ways blackness has been commodified — alluding to similarities to that of a slave auction- and how it is seen often as a vague concept separate from the black body. …


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Photo by Ari Spada on Unsplash

The crime genre is in the midst of a reboot, and it’s female as hell. From Widows and Ocean’s 8 on the big screen, to Big Little Lies being one of the most anticipated shows to return on television, women in crime are having a moment, but it’s shows like Killing Eve and Good Girls that are taking the genre and turning it into something completely new. …


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Courtesy of Netflix

From the moment of their arrest in April of 1989 up until their long-awaited exoneration, the Central Park 5 endured a heinous miscarriage of justice. Their rights were not protected, their character was assassinated, their youthful innocence was taken away, and their humanity was discarded. Their story is interwoven into the larger narrative of the American project that the criminal justice system destroys the lives of children of color.

Ava DuVernay’s latest series, When They See Us, depicts how the criminal justice system failed 5 young boys of color by sentencing them to prison terms for a crime they didn’t commit. Five teenagers, four African Americans and one Latino from Harlem — Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Yusef Salaam, Raymond Santana, and Korey Wise, who came to be known as The Central Park 5, were interrogated (Without parental consent or an attorney present), forced to lie and sign false confessions under the threat of the state, tried, and convicted of the rape of Trisha Meili. It would take until 2002 for all their convictions to be vacated when Matias Reyes, a murderer and serial rapist, admitted to the crime. The Netflix series details the hard truths of a tremendously flawed justice system that still incarcerated children of color as adults at alarming rates, who are presumed guilty until proven innocent. With nuance and dexterous cinematography, Duvernay not only conveys the evil done to the innocent boys but reveals how the criminal justice system still operates in the same destructive ways. …


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ILLUSTRATION BY RYAN MELGAR

Entertainment mogul Clarence Avant was Black excellence before the phrase came into vogue. Although his name may not be familiar to some, Clarence Avant was a mover and shaker in the entertainment industry. His fingerprints are all over the some of the most renowned musical acts, athletes, and politicians over the past 60 years of his impeccable career. The essence of Avant’s modus operandi is captured by the words NFL Hall of Famer Jim Brown who said, “I kept hearing about this guy Clarence Avant, but no one seemed to know what his actual official title was.” …


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Image by tragrpx from Pixabay

Nowadays, it’s nearly impossible to ascertain authenticity when companies take a stance on hot button issues and topics such as diversity. However, there is a way to do it where the beauty and seamless quality can, at the very least, lull us into believing the sentiments behind an ad, show, video and so on are more than an opportune money/attention grab. It can have us believing — believing that people genuinely care and that there’s hope for unity.

But too many companies fall short, veering into racism, colorism and/or sexism without any real understanding of how they’ve failed.

When these failures occur the biggest question is, “How did this get through?” Lack of diversity is, in the words of Kim Crayton, “a risk management issue”. …


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Photo by Spenser on Unsplash

In the conversation on how to combat police brutality, many solutions have been placed on the table: body cams, demilitarization of police, creating movements, and/or studying and understanding structural racism and its relation to policy. But what about time travel? A desperate and comical question initially, but through the lens of fiction, it has been realized.

With the 2019 reboot of Twilight Zone, produced by Jordan Peele, an episode titled, “Replay” introduces time travel as a mechanism for, not just change, but overcoming. …


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The Realer- Youtube

Since it’s beginning on 1520 Sedgwick Avenue in the Morris Heights section of the Boogie Down Bronx. Hip-Hop has predominantly been a male-centric cultural expression. As one of it’s pillars, men have outnumbered women in large numbers in the art of MCing. While there’s always been a contingent of pioneering female MC’s in Hip-Hop music, over the last few years, the tide has turned in significant ways as a large conclave of women, from all different regions of the country are simultaneously making a name for themselves in the rap game. …


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Photo by Scott Umstattd on Unsplash

Paulo Coelho is one of the most well-known Brazilian writers; he sells millions of books all over the world yet surprisingly he’s a firm supporter of piracy. So much so that he even pirates his own books.

The entertainment industry will tell you that nothing is for free and that you must pay up, otherwise creators will starve. But will they, really? Is it that simple? …


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Photo by Lefteris kallergis on Unsplash

I’ll start this off by saying that I like Sweetgreen. I really do. I like it so much that in the rare moments I decide to acknowledge my piggly wiggly belly pressing up against the waistline of my pants, I convince myself that a bowl of Sweetgreen will make it vamoose! In fact, I like Sweetgreen so much that I proudly strut into the fast-casual chain despite knowing I’ll receive disconcerting looks from other patrons for being a chubby negress.

But alas, like many upper-middle class establishments of our day, Sweetgreen has effectively become a place for the young, beautiful and fairer skinned. And this isn’t hyperbole. If you’ve never been to a Sweetgreen, I implore you to visit one during peak hours. What you’ll see is every fit white woman in a five mile-radius swaying in synchronization as they wait for their bowl of over-priced cabbage. …

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Blop Culture

Black. Pop Culture. Blop Culture

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