We Cease to Dream as Adults (Non-Fiction Short Story)

A small little piece that I was inspired to write after reading this Japanese novel that asked why adults ceased to dream, despite having often done so as children. While the novel only mentioned this in passing, the concept itself stayed with me, and I provided my own answer to the question. I completely forgot about this one, however, until I found it while searching for something to post here.

Hemingway Test:
Readability — 8th Grade
Est. Reading Time — 00:01:00

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It is said that when people grow into adults, they cease to dream. That idea had only seemed like a theory, but now it feels as though it wasn’t too far from the truth.

Before I realised, I haven’t been able to see or recall any dreams. The ones I do recall I would quickly jot it down on a notebook, for the frequency has become so scarce that each one was like a treasure to behold. But there have been many others that I never actually recall seeing, and many mornings I wake up in a daze, wondering if I had even slept at all.

But even if I did see a dream, there is no place for me to express my excitement. Dream talk is only acceptable for children, it seems, and any adult that speaks of them is considered weird and living in a fantasy. People would wonder why we bother ourselves with such illusion instead of the more serious, real world issues that permeates our world — like what to wear to work tomorrow.

It is envious to witness children talk about their dreams. Their active imaginations add stories and layers, and it becomes a playtime for them. It is acceptable for adults to hear it from children, but the same talk between adults elicit minimal reaction. There is only the constant ‘oh’ and ‘ah’ which vary little between breaths, each one sapping the enthusiasm out from our bodies. And then we learn to never talk about dreams again.

We Cease to Dream as Adults :: END ::