Featuring special guest Valeria Luiselli, author of “Lost Children Archive” and “Tell Me How it Ends.”

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Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP6-Keeping-the-Borderlands-Close-eirfjk

This week, Stories from the Border co-founder Meena Venkataramanan interviews Valeria Luiselli, an author and essayist who has chronicled the journeys of unaccompanied children from Central America to the United States in her 2017 essay, “Tell Me How It Ends” and her 2019 novel, “Lost Children Archive.” We talk about finding inspiration for her writing, how translation plays a role in her books, and what she imagines her future writing will look like. Produced and edited by Jess Eng.

Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP7-Writing-on-the-Border-env0qu

Or, listen on Spotify here and on Apple Podcasts here.


Featuring special guest Francisco Cantú, author of The Line Becomes A River and former U.S. Border Patrol agent.

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Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP6-Keeping-the-Borderlands-Close-eirfjk

In this episode, former U.S. Border Patrol agent and author Francisco Cantú discusses his 2018 memoir, The Line Becomes A River: Dispatches from the Border. He grapples with his experiences in the force — including the harrowing and the heartbreaking — and, in turn, the important lessons he learned about the U.S.-Mexico border and systemic reform of the immigration system. Reporting by Stories from the Border co-founders Meena Venkataramanan and Vivekae Kim.

Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP6-Keeping-the-Borderlands-Close-eirfjk

Or, listen on Spotify here and on Apple Podcasts here.


Featuring special guests Angel Palazuelos, Reyna Montoya, and Dr. Tom Nerini.

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Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP5-Priced-Out-of-Education-ei6t0e

State law prohibits Arizona’s undocumented high school graduates from attending college as in-state students, making higher education unaffordable. We sat down with Angel Palazuelos, Reyna Montoya, and Dr. Tom Nerini to discuss in-state tuition access in Arizona. Reporting by Stories from the Border summer fellow Nikolas Kirk.

Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP5-Priced-Out-of-Education-ei6t0e

Or, listen on Spotify here and on Apple Podcasts here.


Featuring special guest Professor Phil Torrey, Managing Attorney of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinic and Director of the Harvard Crimmigration Clinic.

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https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP4-Crimmigration-Nation-ehc5ri

This week, Stories from the Border Summer Fellow, Julia Huesa, interviews Phil Torrey. Phil is the Managing Attorney of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program. The two talk about the historical context for crimmigration, his work with clients, and the impact of crimmigration during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP4-Crimmigration-Nation-ehc5ri

Or, listen on Spotify here and on Apple Podcasts here.

Read below for the transcript:

Meena:

Welcome to Broadcasts From the Border. I’m your host, Meena Venkataramanan. This week, Stories From the Border Summer Fellow Julia Huesa interviews Phil Torrey. Phil is the managing attorney of the Harvard Immigration and Refugee Clinical Program. …


Bringing you the latest on immigration and border issues.

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Our header artwork, designed by Christian Thorsberg

EDITORS’ NOTE

Hi everyone! We hope you are safe and healthy, wherever you happen to be. This is the twenty-second edition of The Borderline, Stories from the Border’s weekly newsletter on immigration and border issues. This is our curated summary of what we’ve been reading and working on throughout this summer. With all of us social distancing and doing our part to cure the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re publishing from our own corners of the country: Arizona, California, Illinois, Massachusetts, North Carolina, and Texas.

This week, we are seeing more national backlash to surveillance and arrests of peaceful protestors by unidentified federal law enforcement officers — many from U.S. Custom and Border Protection (CBP) and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) — in unmarked vehicles in Portland, Oregon, since July 1. This week, the U.S. Attorney General for Oregon asked the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to review the reports and Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler, who has faced scrutiny over local police violence, was tear-gassed alongside protestors as he demanded an end to the federal officers’ occupation. DHS plans to send about 150 federal agents to Chicago and another CBP Special Response team was placed in Seattle, as about 2,000 officers from CBP, ICE, and other law enforcement entities remain on standby for rapid deployment to other major cities with Democratic mayors. On Thursday, the Department of Justice Inspector General announced an investigation of federal law enforcement actions in Portland and Washington, D.C. The DHS Inspector General announced another probe into CBP agent conduct in Portland. Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez plans to introduce a House bill requiring on-duty federal agents to clearly identify themselves. …


Bringing you the latest on immigration and border issues.

Image for post
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Our header artwork, designed by Christian Thorsberg.

EDITORS’ NOTE

Hi everyone! We hope you are safe and healthy, wherever you happen to be. This is the twenty-second edition of The Borderline, Stories from the Border’s weekly newsletter on immigration and border issues. This is our curated summary of what we’ve been reading and working on throughout this summer. With all of us social distancing and doing our part to cure the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re publishing from our own corners of the country: Arizona, California, Illinois, North Carolina, and Texas.

This week, we are seeing rejections of new Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) applications, despite last month’s Supreme Court ruling and a letter by several business executives — including those of Apple, Facebook, Google and General Motors — to keep the program in place. President Trump assured that a new merit-based immigration plan he aims to unveil in the next month will contain some protections for would-be DACA beneficiaries. While presidential candidate Joe Biden has promised to grant Venezuelans already in the US Temporary Protected Status, President Trump has not done the same. …


Bringing you the latest on immigration and border issues.

Image for post
Image for post
Our header artwork, designed by Christian Thorsberg

EDITORS’ NOTE

Hi everyone! We hope you are safe and healthy, wherever you happen to be. This is the twenty-second edition of The Borderline, Stories from the Border’s weekly newsletter on immigration and border issues. This is our curated summary of what we’ve been reading and working on throughout this summer. With all of us social distancing and doing our part to cure the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re publishing from our own corners of the country: Arizona, California, Illinois, North Carolina, and Texas.

This week, we are seeing another attempt by the Trump administration to block pathways for immigration when ICE made a “broadcast message” announcing that international students in the U.S. attending schools that are going all online for the fall cannot stay in the country. International students attending universities that would only have online classes are being made to leave the country or transfer to another school with in-person learning. In response, Harvard and M.I.T. sued the Trump administration in federal court to have this rule overturned and a letter signed by 99 members of Congress was sent to the Trump administration condemning the rule.


Featuring special guest Professor John Morán González, director of the Center for Mexican American Studies at UT Austin.

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https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP3-Refusing-to-Forget-eg02nn

This week, our producer Jess Eng interviews Professor John Morán González, who is an English professor at The University of Texas at Austin and the Director for the Center for Mexican American Studies. Professor González is well known for his work on early 20th-century history at the US — Mexico border, and specifically, the 1915–1920 Borderlands War, an undeclared war resulting in some of the worst state-sanctioned racial violence in American history.

Growing up in the border town of Brownsville, Texas, Professor González always wondered why stories like these were being left out of the textbooks. In 2013, Professor González helped launch the educational non-profit Refusing to Forget along with four historians. …


Featuring special guest Ana Puente Flores, immigration writer and scholar-activist.

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Listen to the episode here: https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP2-Art-in-Detention-efn02n

This week, we’re joined by Ana Puente Flores, an immigration writer and scholar-activist from Mexico City who is currently based in New York, for a conversation on immigration detention, art, and empowerment. We talk about some misconceptions surrounding gender and immigration law in the United States, the risks detained immigrant women in particular face in detention, and why zines are an ideal platform for activism.

Listen to the episode at https://anchor.fm/broadcastsfromtheborder/episodes/EP2-Art-in-Detention-efn02n

Or, listen on Spotify here and on Apple Podcasts here.

Read the transcript below, transcribed by Nikolas Kirk:

Meena:

Welcome to Broadcasts from the Border. I’m your host, Meena Venkataramanan. This week, we’re joined by Ana Puente Flores, an immigration writer and scholar activist from Mexico City who is currently based in New York for a conversation on immigration detention, art, and empowerment. Ana has worked with New York Times bestselling author Valeria Luiselli to start a creative writing workshop for detained immigrant children at the Children’s Village, a special facility in New York for housing juvenile detainees that is contracted with the federal government’s Office of Refugee Resettlement. …


Bringing you the latest on immigration and border issues

Image for post
Image for post
Our header artwork, designed by Christian Thorsberg.

EDITORS’ NOTE

Hi everyone! We hope you are safe and healthy, wherever you happen to be. This is the twenty-first edition of The Borderline, Stories from the Border’s weekly newsletter on immigration and border issues. This is our curated summary of what we’ve been reading and working on throughout this summer. With all of us social distancing and doing our part to cure the COVID-19 pandemic, we’re publishing from our own corners of the country: Arizona, California, Illinois, North Carolina, and Texas.

As the country grapples with systemic racism and racial injustice against Black people, Abdi Nor Iftin, a young Somali immigrant displaced in Kenya who came to the United States in 2014, published a second edition of his memoir “Call Me American.” His written story aims to “promote understanding of immigrants, refugees, Muslims, and Somalis.” …

Stories from the Border

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