Working with Brands to Create Value

As part of Brandpoint’s 20th Anniversary celebration, we’ve developed “Content Makers,” a four-part blog series giving you a behind-the-scenes look at our passionate team of content creators and strategists. We’ll explore what it looks like to tell a great story in 2016, what it means to truly understand an audience, and what the future of content marketing looks like through the eyes of those who live it each day.

Every night my daughter picks out three books for us to read together. She loves this nighttime ritual, and I have to admit that it’s one of the most cherished parts of my day, too. Young and old, everyone loves a good story — and you can’t go wrong with cuddles and an intriguing tale.

In today’s increasingly digital world, stories are all around us. Each competes for our attention, though many are nothing more than white noise. Within the chaos, however, some of these stories stick. Maybe it’s a blog post that resonates, a social post that inspires, or a newspaper article that teaches us something new.

I’m lucky because I get to tell stories for a career. As a writer, it’s my job to capture the messages my clients want to convey and then tell them in meaningful ways. My goal is to create content that breaks through the clutter to reach the target audience for that one valuable moment out of their day.

I love what I do because every day is a new adventure. I might spend my morning writing about childhood nutrition, switch gears to tackle financial considerations for small businesses in the afternoon, and then finish the day polishing off a piece about employee retention for HR managers. There’s never a dull moment.

Brandpoint clients come from virtually every industry, and even though the topics I write about vary greatly, I approach each assignment carefully and consistently. While writing is a creative process, Brandpoint takes a methodical approach when onboarding and engaging with our clients — and that’s what makes our stories meaningful.

Because we establish a close relationship with each client, we are able to really understand their goals and needs. Before I type one word I feel confident I know the client’s target audience, what they hope to achieve and what makes them different. Those foundational pieces of the puzzle help me create effective copy, and because every client is different, everything we develop is unique.

Our process allows us to choose a strategy, share knowledge and conduct research, all before writing even begins. As I expand my understanding of the client and their topic, I strive to uncover those nuggets that inspire “aha” moments. It might be a compelling stat, a surprising tip or unusual insight. These are what help our work — our stories — break through the white noise, change perceptions and capture attention.

Whether the result of our work is a social campaign or a lengthy white paper, all Brandpoint copy goes through our internal editing process. I must toot our horn, here — our editors are the best of the best. Not only does this step ensure only top-quality material goes out to our clients, but it also ensures we writers are continuously honing our craft.

When the time comes to send our first drafts to clients, we strive to hit a home run right away. Sometimes, however, there is a learning curve and we need to do more work to get things right. Every writer at Brandpoint embraces feedback from clients, though, because it helps us learn more about our clients and their industries.

This open communication with our clients is essential to a productive working relationship, and when our proven expertise in the content marketing world is paired with a client’s own expertise, we’re able to create stories that matter. And as any parent knows, those stories are worth reading time and time again.

Laura Malm is Senior Content Editor at Brandpoint with more than 15 years of experience in journalism and public relations.


This post first appeared on Brandpoint.com.

One clap, two clap, three clap, forty?

By clapping more or less, you can signal to us which stories really stand out.