Detail of “Buffy Summers #2” | image via

An interview with Stacia Yeapanis on the blurry lines between television fandom and fine art in her video and fiber work.

Stacia Yeapanis is a Chicago-based artist whose work has spanned across genres and mediums — from creating intricate, colorful sculptures from collected objects and collage to screen-capping images from The Sims computer game. She got her MFA in Fiber at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) in 2006, and now teaches at the school. During grad school and throughout the aughts, Yeapanis fell down the rabbit hole of fandom, and became preoccupied with gathering moments from television. She created painstaking cross-stitched images of TV characters crying and curated clips of characters in existential crisis. …


If you need something to write on your bathroom mirror:

Buffy: “I may be dead, but I’m still pretty.”

— Prophecy Girl, Season 1, Episode 12

My eternal mantra | image via

If you are concerned about your mental health:

Cordelia: “Embrace the pain, spank your inner moppet, whatever, but get over it. ’Cause pretty soon you’re not even gonna have the loser friends you’ve got now.”

— When She Was Bad, Season 2, Episode 1


Clarke and Lexa from The 100 | via

Waiting to see if our lesbian and bisexual TV characters can dodge bullets with bated breath.

In preschool, my teacher separated me and my friend Rachel for being too affectionate. Our little four-year-old romance was founded on sharing chapstick and a tandem bike at play time, but holding hands and kissing was the last straw for our teachers. Years passed, I changed schools, and my gay pre-k adventure faded — I grew up into an straight girl.

Except, I wasn’t entirely straight. I made jokes about being “a little gay.” I said with a guarded laugh that I was only 80% straight. But I was always shied from the “bisexual” label, and set parameters for when…


The face of a bipartisan future | image via

Parks and Recreation’s Ron Swanson lends libertarianism and conservatism some much needed humanity

In “King of the Hill: The Last Bipartisan TV Comedy,” Bert Clere argues FOX’s animated sitcom King of the Hill (1997–2010) transcends distinctions of “red” and “blue” by conveying its “redneck” Texas characters with complexity and compassion. Clere grew up in rural North Carolina and saw his own world in the series.

Clere opens his article with the broad statement that while American conservatives watch crime dramas and reality shows, American liberals “generally love quirky comedies like Community, Parks and Recreation, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and The Mindy Project.”

While I agree with much of what Clere says here…


The face of a bipartisan future | image via

Parks and Recreation’s Ron Swanson lends libertarianism and conservatism some much needed humanity

In a recent article for The Atlantic titled “King of the Hill: The Last Bipartisan TV Comedy,” author Bert Clere argues that the animated sitcom about life in Texas transcended the distinctions of “red” and “blue,” and conveyed its “redneck” characters with complexity and compassion. Clere grew up in rural North Carolina, and saw his own world in King of the Hill.

Clere opens his article with the broad statement that while conservatives watch crime dramas and reality shows, “liberals generally love quirky comedies like Community, Parks and Recreation, It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, and The Mindy Project.” While his…


Four of the best Asperger’s characters on television | image via author

The world is more aware and understanding of autistic spectrum disorders than ever — and we have great television to thank.

Growing up, TV was the closest thing my family had to church. We ritualistically gathered around our garish 90s television to watch all ten seasons of Stargate: SG1 and every episode of Xena together. With the arrival of Amazon, I knew another season of our favorite show had arrived when I saw my brother running home from our rural post office with a package, tearing through our yard at full speed.

It was TV that first made me notice something was different about my brother. He could rattle off a complex quote from a show, then say the season, episode…


Homes on Airbnb are not always as safe as they seem | image via Blogger

Thoughts on the hazards of the “Sharing Economy” and the liabilities of life, as illustrated by To Kill A Mockingbird

The Sharing Economy is terrifying. As brilliant as every new app, new startup, new great idea is, each comes with the risk that something can go horribly wrong. In November, journalist Zak Stone shared the story of his last encounter with Airbnb, the home/apartment sharing platform that has rocketed in popularity in the past few years. The piece, titled “Living and Dying on Airbnb” chronicles the death of his father, who wrongfully died on the property — killed on a idyllic tree swing by a broken branch outside their rented Austin cottage.

Stone’s is truly a tragic story, which outlines…


A recent episode of the podcast Call Your Girlfriend explores black culture in the age of dating apps, Goop, and a growing national dialogue around blackness.

Every morning, I listen to a podcast as I buzz around my apartment — curling my hair, feeding my cat, making coffee. Previously, the even-keeled tones of the NPR Morning Edition fill the sleepy air of my studio, but lately, I’ve been listening to a much different podcast: Call Your Girlfriend.

Aminatou (Amina) Sow, co-host of Call Your Girlfriend | image via

Call Your Girlfriend is the audio undertaking of two amazing women: Ann Friedman (a New York Magazine columnist) and Aminatou Sow (a digital strategist who was named one of Forbes’ “30 Under 30” in their tech category). …


Standing on the ruins of the patriarchy | CW

In the CW’s popular post-apocalyptic drama, the meek don’t inherit the earth — the women do.

There is a fantastic quote by literary critic Frederic Jameson that suggests “it is easier to imagine the end of the world than to imagine capitalism.” Jameson muses that a world ransacked by an apocalypse is easier to conjure than one where capitalism is not the dominant mode of Western existence. When writers look into the future and see a collapse of capitalism (or a global expanse of capitalism), they create apocalypses or dystopias. …


The Killing forces audiences to acknowledge and empathize with murder victims, even in its promo photos | AMC

Rain-soaked, slow, and unflinchingly real — The Killing is the best atmospheric crime drama you’ve never seen.

If television genres are like ice cream shops, crime dramas are like Baskin Robins: there are 31 flavors, and just about every combination imaginable. A rapid succession of grotesque serial killers with an ensemble cast? Criminal Minds. A black comedy about murder in snowy Minnesota? Fargo. A towering figure of Victorian murder mystery running around contemporary London? Sherlock. How about a show starring a serial killer killing other serial killers? Dexter.

All of these shows have the sugary sweet satisfaction of polish — witty writing, quick pacing, perfect soundtracks and savvy sleuths solving murders each week — but not one…

Brontë Mansfield

writer | zebra cake connoisseur

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