Richard Hendricks contemplating Pied Piper and it’s failures in Silicon Valley.

Why you’ll never be finished with designing your product.

If there’s one thing I’ve learned from my time spent building Beepyo for over the past year, it’s that, you’ll never be “finished” with designing a product. Here’s why.

New and innovative technology is always moving faster than designers have time to keep up with, and this is a good thing. Just 2 years ago, product designers were barely establishing a standard for UX/UI in phone applications. Now jump to present time, we’ve since introduced tech such as virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D touch, wearable smart devices, and so much more to consider and design for.

I can’t remember the last time I’ve browsed through Medium and didn’t happen to stumble upon a “new sketch plugin that’ll make your design workflow 100x better!” or “X product — a new tool for wire-framing and prototyping”.

With technology moving at such a quick pace, it’s never been a more important time to keep up with trends and ways to improve design practices.

Magic Leap, an augmented reality company, is backed by some of the most pronounced tech companies (Google, Alibaba, Qualcomm, etc…)

New and innovative technology is always moving faster than designers have time to keep up with, and this is a good thing.

This brings me to my next point. No matter how well built the UX/UI for your product is, it’ll only be great, until it’s not. That’s because UX/UI tends to trend differently over time. Last year, hamburger menus were a thing. Hamburger menus hid all the sub-settings of an application to give more space for what the primary page should be used for.

Today, we’re seeing a trend where exposed fixed footers allow users to quickly toggle between important features in the application, allowing for easier navigation and reducing the amount of clicks from 2 to 1. Why you ask? My guess is because well, bigger phone screens are now a thing, and more real estate = more to do.

Here are some apps in mind that have shifted to a fixed footer.


Fixed Footer — left, Hamburger Menu — right (Beepyo)

Fixed Footer — Left, Hamburger Menu — Right (Spotify)

No matter how well built the UX/UI for your product is, it’ll only be great, until it’s not.

My last point touches more upon the feeling behind design. It’s clear that UX/UI design have clear objective results, but visual design can be subjective at times. The crazy thing about subjectiveness are that people are constantly influenced by different things and feel different things. The truth is, even if your product has amazing UX/UI, visually, some people might just not like the look of it.

It’s just like food, you can make the best PB&J in the world, but if I don’t like peanut butter , chances are I won’t like your sandwich . That’s not to say you you shouldn’t stop making PB&J’s. My point is, always keep in mind your target audience when designing, who will be using it most? What visual cues are most attractive to them and how can you reach them emotionally with your visual design? As you continue to grow and develop your product, you may find that your market may change or be drawn to different visual cues.

Remember, feelings change sometimes and it’s important to explore the different ways your visuals can connect with your audience’s emotions.

Lets explore how some companies use visuals to appeal to their audiences.


(Left) Airbnb focuses on letting images of places become their keystone visual to appeal to travelers. (Right) Lyft keeps to more playful and light-hearted visuals, they focus on making their customer’s rides fun and enjoyable.

UX/UI design is great and have clear objective results, but visual design can be subjective at times.

At Beepyo, our visuals are bright, lively and delightful. We strive to make the engagement of buying and selling as personal and joyful as possible for our members.

Thats it! This is why you should never stop working on your product. If you feel the same way (or not), feel free to share, like and/or comment!

Beepyo is the best way to buy and sell locally. We’re looking to launch our closed — beta in September of 2016. If you’re interested in Beepyo’s journey, read my partners article about what we’ve learned over the past year (trust me, it won’t disappoint) — link to the article.

Visit Beepyo.com for more information on how to become a closed-beta participant!
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