Assured Temporality

Our status as sojourners


We were not, and are not, meant to be apart of this world. Plain and simply put, that is the truth. As the saved family of Christ, our eternal home is in heaven, with the Father, living for eternity in the abundance of His glory.

I was reminded of all this whilst packing up my dorm room and taking note of all the “lasts” at V1 — last dinner, last shower, last time on the internet, etc. All these “last” instances carried a bit of emotional strain: I had established this place fairly firmly as my home. I had been in my dorm room, quite frankly, for longer than I have been at my actual home (and to be frank, I’ve been in downtown for longer than I have been in my actual home). Understandably, then, having to pack everything up and making my last few rounds in here, was emotionally charged and left a lot for reflection.

It wasn’t really memories — I’ve had none here, it’s a fairly functional room for sleeping, gaming, reading, and the like; it surely wasn’t the room itself — admittedly its a cozy enough three meter by three meter concrete room that leaks cold and warm air depending on the season; but I suppose rather, it was simply the concept of it. A rest and a refuge with all my things in it.

But here I am, as I pack up my things, throwing clothes into suitcases, computer components into boxes, clearing out drawers, I was really reminded of the temporary nature of things. People come and go, things are built and then destroyed, memories are created and then forgotten. Take a step back, and this thought isn’t simply for my residence room, but it’s the same for university.

Upper years leave and a more frosh come in. Repeat ad infinitum. One step further. We are born and then we die. From dust we have come and to dust we shall return. But here comes the important part. When we die, as the adopted sons and daughters of Christ, we are destined for the kingdom of God, the heavenly realms of His reign. That is the destination, the place with no suffering nor pain, no weeping nor loss, no death nor sick, but simply the glory of God perfectly manifest, perfect fellowship with the Father. And yet, for some of us, we fear death — not that it might be painful, or anything like that, but simply because it means less of this earth, no more time with our friends, no more of our enjoyment of the things of this earth.

That’s what some of us fear. Death in itself doesn’t scare us, but the consequences of it does. And its understandable. For some of us, its most, if not all that we’ve known. We’ve spent so much time focusing on the things of this earth that when it really matters, its hard for us to move our focus off of it; so we return constantly to it.

So we do not focus on what is seen, but on what is unseen. For what is seen is temporary, but what is unseen is eternal.

Paul writes firmly here to keep our eyes on eternity, on the things that cannot be seen, that is, the full manifest glory of God, the Son, the Father, the Spirit, and His coming kingdom. We see glimpses of that now, but we have yet to see in full. We must constantly be reminded to keep our gaze fixed on the eternal reward, on the eternal promise that He has given to us. We must let His word dwell in our hearts richly so much so that the things of this earth seem strange and foreign to us, for we are not of this world, this earth is not our home, but rather, heaven is our home.

Our lives here are surely temporary, the earth and all it contains is surely temporary, so do not store up your treasures on this earth, but rather, in heaven where it has been assured to be yours.

Do not lay up for yourselves treasures on earth, where moth and rust destroy and where thieves break in and steal, but lay up for yourselves treasures in heaven, where neither moth nor rust destroys and where thieves do not break in and steal. For where your treasure is, there your heart will be also. ~ Matthew 6:19–21


Feel free to contact me at bryan.tw.wong@gmail.com or through social media if you have any questions, concerns, comments, etc.

“Go therefore, and make disciples of all the nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe all things that I have commanded you; and lo, I am with you always, even to the end of the age” Amen. ~ Matthew 28:19–20
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