A rebuttal to critics of Islam’s Non-Believers
Rayhana Sultan
4710

If the best available tools of science and philosophy operating on a modern advanced world has fallen short anywhere, it’s the failure to cure stupidity and wilful ignorance.

Science isn’t magic. It’s a tool. The outcomes it can create are entirely up to how it is used. What in the world would motivate the elites who control vast numbers of people through fear to dedicate scientific resources to curing stupidity and willful ignorance?

Why should a billionaire whose continued growth in wealth depends on the control and exploitation of people around the world contribute one penny to eliminating the very qualities in so many people that enable him to exploit and control them? Why should he not lobby and bribe government officials around the world to block any and all legislation in any and all jurisdictions that threaten that? It makes no difference if it’s an American oil baron or a Saudi oil prince; they will use the means at their disposal to continue their domination.

I would say the answer is empathy, but how much empathy can you expect from someone rapacious enough to devote a lifetime to amassing such wealth and power in the first place? Or someone who was born into enormous privilege and indoctrinated to hold fast to his elevated status, who cannot begin to comprehend the struggles of the average world citizen?

Islam is a system of control. Just like other religions. Just like nationalism in America, where even foolhardy atheists can be made to essentially worship the Constitution. These systems of control are used by hypocrites who violate their basic tenets over and again in a nonstop quest for personal gain, who, all the while, force others to adhere to these systems and bring down the judgment of the law on disempowered people who commit those same violations.

This is why divorcing religion from government is one of the great battles of our ancestors that still rages today. Bronze Age mythology has no place in the law of modern humanity, but the powerful interests who want it to remain in place, or even strengthen its hold on nations around the world, are not about to just roll over and let that happen. One could argue the solution is education, but, as the story of Malala Yousafzai has shown us, the implementation of that solution is not always so easy. Even in places like America, so many are still in the dark, and anachronistic, superstitious ideas about reality still shoehorn their way into public education. It raises the question of whether the battle can even be won. And then you look at the irreligiousness of a place like China, which still suffers from myriad problems of exploitation and human rights violations, and it reminds us that, even if we do win that battle, we are a long way from winning the war.