Rudy Giuliani’s pathetic press conference underscored how little President Trump has to back his claims of election fraud. It was also hilarious.

Former New York City Mayor and current Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani.
Former New York City Mayor and current Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani.
Former New York City Mayor and current Trump lawyer Rudy Giuliani. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Image

By Linette Lopez

On Thursday former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani — representing the President of the United States — took to television to decry the outcome of the 2020 election, spout conspiracy theories, and echo disproven lies.

One of his equally glassy-eyed fellows claimed that former Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez — a man who died in 2013 — helped rig the 2020 election.

Giuliani sweat so profusely that his hair dye ran down his face. He visibly spit into the audience during a pandemic. He waxed philosophical about a favorite movie. It was like being stuck in a conversation with a drunken person at the dumbest country club. …


President Donald Trump will leave office with more Americans out of work than when he started, and with the US’s international reputation damaged.

President Donald Trump delivering his inaugural address at the US Capitol on January 20, 2017.
President Donald Trump delivering his inaugural address at the US Capitol on January 20, 2017.
President Donald Trump delivering his inaugural address at the US Capitol on January 20, 2017. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

By Ashley Collman

On January 20, 2017, a newly inaugurated President Donald Trump gave a rousing address promising to return power in America to the people and restore the country’s greatness on the world stage.

He also envisioned a future in which American citizens were united through patriotism and the country was seen as a shining example to the world.

Four years on, none of these visions have been realized. …


A complicated set of guidelines regarding which Americans should get priority have stymied states’ efforts to maximize the number of shots in arms.

A frontline healthcare worker receives a Moderna COVID-19 vaccination on January 5, 2021.
A frontline healthcare worker receives a Moderna COVID-19 vaccination on January 5, 2021.
A frontline healthcare worker receives a Moderna COVID-19 vaccination at the Park County Health Departments storefront clinic on January 5, 2021 in Livingston, Montana. Photo: William Campbell/Getty Images

By Aylin Woodward

Officials are scrambling to speed-up COVID-19 vaccinations across the US, but a complicated set of guidelines regarding who should get priority have stymied states’ efforts to maximize the number of shots in arms.

Indeed, the US’s roll out efficacy is so poor that it’s roughly 12% that of Israel’s, which is one track to become the world’s first nation to immunize its population against the coronavirus.

As of January 15, Israel has administered 24 doses per 100 people, the highest per-capita rate for any country by a large margin, according to Bloomberg. By comparison, the US has administered 3.6 …


Years of unaccountability and militarization have made police a paramilitary force that doesn’t fear consequence.

US Capitol police officers try to stop supporters of US President Donald Trump to enter the Capitol on January 6, 2021.
US Capitol police officers try to stop supporters of US President Donald Trump to enter the Capitol on January 6, 2021.
US Capitol police officers try to stop supporters of US President Donald Trump to enter the Capitol on January 6, 2021, in Washington, DC. Photo: Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

By Eoin Higgins

In the wake of last week’s Capitol riots, the danger of the American right-wing has become impossible to ignore.

But if Americans — and particularly Democrats — are serious about addressing the conditions that led to the riot and the burgeoning fascist movement that last week threatened to topple the US government, they’ll need to address the role of law enforcement in supporting far right agendas across the country, as well as police participation in the Capitol riot.

Cops on the ground

Off duty cops were a presence in the crowd that stormed the Capitol, according to numerous reports. They flashed their badges at Capitol Police and told the on duty officers, “We’re doing this for you.” …


Millionaires allocate their time and energy differently from others and exhibit certain traits, like frugality and resiliency, to build wealth.

Millionaires don’t build wealth without standing out from the crowd.
Millionaires don’t build wealth without standing out from the crowd.
Millionaires don’t build wealth without standing out from the crowd. Edward Berthelot/Getty Images

By Hillary Hoffower

Self-made millionaires didn’t get to the two-comma club without doing things a little differently from the rest.

Various researchers who studied hundreds of self-made millionaires for several years have found that many tend to practice different habits or display heightened traits that help them build wealth. Many millionaires, for example, allocate their time differently — they spend more time focusing on personal growth, planning for investments, and working, and less time sleeping.

They also gravitate toward similar wealth-building strategies, like saving as much as they can and bringing in multiple income streams. And when it comes to investing, millionaires love low-cost index funds and real estate. Millionaires also tend to be frugal, conscientious, and resilient — all traits that help amplify their wealth-building actions. …


Dr. Joy Henningsen says she felt muscle aches and soreness six hours after getting the Pfizer shot, but felt almost back to normal 48 hours later.

Joy Henningsen receiving the second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on January 7.
Joy Henningsen receiving the second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on January 7.
Joy Henningsen receiving the second dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on January 7. Joy Henningsen

By Joy Henningsen

Dr. Joy Henningsen is a diagnostic radiologist at the Birmingham Veterans Affairs Medical Center and a clinical assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

I was extremely fortunate to receive the initial dose of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine on December 17, the first week it was offered in the United States outside of a clinical trial. …


When a parent is stressed, depressed, abusive , or over-involved, their kids respond — with mental health impacts for a lifetime.

Image for post
Image for post
If parents have open communication and adequately set rules, young adults feel higher levels of family satisfaction. Photo: AP

By Allana Akhtar and Caroline Hroncich

For better or worse, how your parents behaved when you grew up has had — and likely will have — a lasting impact on who you are today.

Clinical and research psychologists have studied how adults suffered from poor parenting for decades. Whether your mom or dad was over-involved in your life or neglectful, there are negative consequences to certain types of parental behavior.

While young children emulate their parents early on, adolescents and adults who recognize negative behavior can manage the influence parents have on them, said Carl Pickhardt, a psychologist and the author of “Who Stole My Child?: …


Ruth Ben-Ghiat says although Trump is leaving office, his loyalists who remain in power could create more chaos to undermine the Biden administration.

Trump supporters stand on the US Capitol Police armored vehicle as others take over the steps of the Capitol.
Trump supporters stand on the US Capitol Police armored vehicle as others take over the steps of the Capitol.
Trump supporters stand on the US Capitol Police armored vehicle as others take over the steps of the Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021, as the Congress works to certify the electoral college votes. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

By Ruth Ben-Ghiat

“I know you’re disappointed, but I want you to know that our incredible journey is just beginning,” President Trump told his followers via video on January 7, finally acknowledging his loss to Joe Biden in the November 3 election. …


The most successful people know there are more benefits to taking up a hobby than simply blowing off steam.

Former Microsoft chairman Bill Gates likes to play bridge.
Former Microsoft chairman Bill Gates likes to play bridge.
Former Microsoft chairman Bill Gates likes to play bridge. Photo: Rick Wilking/Reuters

By Hillary Hoffower and Marguerite Ward

The most successful people know there is more to life than simply eating, sleeping, and working — it’s about enjoying life, too.

Right now, amid the coronavirus pandemic, you might find yourself social distancing and with a lot more time on your hands. If so, now’s a great time to take up a hobby, something that can not only help relieve stress, but can even help make you more successful.

Playing a musical instrument, for example, can stimulate your creativity, analytical skills, and fine motor skills. Reading can boost different types of intelligence and exercising can help with mental acuity. …


Executive coach Peggy Caruso says scheduling time for self-care and checking in with loved ones can help you avoid fixating on negative thoughts.

A woman meditates.
A woman meditates.
FatCamera/Getty Images

By Peggy Caruso

It can be challenging to be fully active in all aspects of your life, both personally and professionally, while avoiding unhealthy and negative behavior. Because of this, there are many people who stay so focused on their day-to-day routines and obligations that they miss very important signs of stress that can affect their career and family.

After an early life filled with abuse, financial challenges, tragedy, and being solely responsible financially and emotionally for two children, I found myself overwhelmed by the negatives in my life. …

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