Four Verifiable New Zealand Made Fashion Designers

Provenance Marketing in fashion helps consumers choose

While not all New Zealand fashion designers and makers label their products as New Zealand Made, there are a number who are clear with their provenance marketing and label using the Kiwi trademark.

1. Velvet Heartbeat is New Zealand Made

Velvet Heartbeat ethically produces vegan handbags and accessories lovingly handmade in New Zealand from the finest cruelty free materials.

Velvet Heartbeat makes it clear which products are New Zealand Made here:

2. Deryn Schmidt is New Zealand Made

Deryn Schmidt makes all their garments in New Zealand which speaks to their ‘superior level of finish, detail, feel and fit’ underlying their dedication towards enduring nature and the longevity of garments. They have a store in Wellington where you can see them sewing the very garments they sell.

Deryn Schmidt also makes it clear that all her products are New Zealand Made here: https://buynz.org.nz/DerynSchmidt

3. Desiree is New Zealand Made

Desiree also labels her garments as New Zealand Made and you can view clearly on our site which garments this applies to.

4. Judith Ann Ford Cashews brand is New Zealand Made

Cashews is designed and manufactured in New Zealand by Judith Anne Ford Ltd. The Cashews label creates clothes that are flattering, fashionable and make women feel gorgeous and unique in their style.

Judith Ann Ford labels her garments (which is verifiable here) as New Zealand Made using the Kiwi trademark.

Shop Judith Ann Ford

Should your fashion garment be labelled with the Kiwi trademark?

If it provides consumers certainty at a glance, it is likely that you will gain a market origin advantage by labelling with the Kiwi trademark.

It also ensures that consumers can check which fashion designers are selling New Zealand Made licensed products.

Fashion businesses should review whether a Kiwi trademark licence is right for you here.

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