Things You Can Instagram

A couple years ago, very interesting person Russell Davies said this:

“It did make me think — some museum or gallery should just a show called Things You Can Instagram. That’s all anyone wants.”

Museums have become locations for social conquest. A venue to display an evolved, inspired sense of self to ones’ peer groups.

I am not a curator, but given the above, creating an exhibit titled “Things You Can Instagram” intrigues me. It would be lucrative given the crowds. Vogue even. I could inspire the unwashed with the uncommon. A noble cause in that right.

But what would be in it?

After searching for themes that were pervasive on Iconosphere, I arrived at three distinct things people tend to Instagram at museums: Celebrity related totems, installations involving water or vivid light and people as art. Then, I asked a few people I knew, not all of them artists, to have a think about it specific examples of these themes.

Some of these examples are ridiculous but then again, so is the art world.

  1. CELEBRITY TOTEMS

An exploration of the properties found in hip-hop star Drake’s tear duct fluid. His emotional pain being so deep it can cure another’s.

2. A ROOM WITH LIGHTS OR WATER:

Installation of 27 life size Teddy Ruxpin dolls restored from the 80’s. They are equipped with hypersenstive audio tape recorders that repeat everything anyone is saying within a 20 foot radius. The wall of noise they create sonically powers a Polynesian boat they ride on. The more talking, yelling or noise around them, the faster the boat goes around the pool. The pool is filled solely with high levels of chlorine to dissuade would be divers.

3. PEOPLE AS ART:

An installation of museum guards as they stand next to and protect photography of themselves. They will be in similar poses as the photos. If guards switch rooms the photograph is replaced with that of the new guard.

See you at the Rain Room.

Special thanks to Dan Killian and Chris Rosales.

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