Summary

Why is it so hard to achieve diversity in the workplace despite expensive policies on diversity and genuinely motivated managers that want to see more diversity in the workplace? The answer may lie in the economic pressures that make it difficult for most firms to leverage diversity to a competitive advantage.

Note: The opinions stated here are my own, not those of Google

By treating diversity management as a cost-benefit tradeoff that is dependent on the culture and history of each firm, we can see that the ability to achieve diversity at a strategic advantage is limited by institutional factors that make it difficult for managers to move away from. Achieving a strategy where diversity comes only with benefits and no costs is difficult and may not even be possible for most firms. …


Note: The opinions stated here are my own, not those of Google.

While we take it for granted today that the nerds have taken over, it’s easy to forget that those who write today’s rules were a fringe group of cultural misfits in the 1980s. The nerds and geeks were far from being seen as cute or quirky. Being a geek used to be a bad thing, it could get you beaten up, drowned in a toilet, and definitely meant girls wouldn’t dance with you at the school dance. They weren’t celebrated, they were ridiculed. …


tl;dr — Technology doesn’t disrupt markets, people disrupt markets.

Clayton Christensen was right all along, but we’ve been looking at his theory from the perspective of the firm instead of the perspective of the market. Changing that view has dramatic impact on the usefulness of his theory.

Note: The opinions stated here are my own, not those of Google

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The land rush for new user value explains how companies can capitalize on new technologies far better than the high-risk model of Moonshots.

Christensen’s theory of disruptive innovation has provided useful insights for firms navigating new and changing markets for the past two decades with much discussion in that same period devoted to expanding upon it by explaining and accommodating for certain exemptions from the theory (Uber, big bang disruption, etc.). However, generalizing one specific tenet of the original theory explains many of these apparent exceptions and shows that sustaining and disruptive innovation are more descriptive when also defined in terms of the market’s prioritization of values rather than solely in terms of the incumbent’s competitive strategy. Generalizing disruption to include the market-centric view in addition to the predominant firm-centric view clarifies the competitive nature of disruption and provides new explanations as to why advantage is difficult to attain, even for firms that follow good practices for innovation. …


Note: The opinions stated here are my own, not those of Google.

While we take it for granted today that the nerds have taken over, it’s easy to forget that those who write today’s rules were a fringe group of cultural misfits in the 1980s. The nerds and geeks were far from being seen as cute or quirky. Being a geek used to be a bad thing, it could get you beaten up, drowned in a toilet, and definitely meant girls wouldn’t dance with you at the school dance. They weren’t celebrated, they were ridiculed. …


Magical Internet Blockchain Robots is a series that describes the capabilities of the blockchain without going into how it works. This edition explains how the future of online dating with blockchain tech can change the way we see and use privacy forever.

Note: The opinions stated here are my own, not those of Google.

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The current generation of public regrets has nothing on the coming generation of permanently immutable regrets. Millennials may be used to the idea of a Facebook post ruining their social lives, but the central source of control over these posts give some level of responsibility to the company that stores the content. …


The most advanced privacy method known to mankind could soon be publicly available to anyone and everyone.

Note: The opinions stated here are my own, not those of Google.

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From the infamous Orson Wells’ “The third man”… it will make sense by the end of the post.

Explaining crypto with magical internet blockchain robots.

Crypto and blockchain are still in their infancy by commercial technology standards. The blockchain community can’t even build a decent digital ponzi scheme without getting repeatedly hacked and even using Metamask is too confusing for the average muggle. In order to move the ecosystem forward, there needs to be a better method of describing how these products work and what their capabilities are.

If product managers and designers are willing to trust these new technologies without having to completely understand them, then we can treat them as a black box with particular capabilities. Since Clarke’s third law states “Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic,” I have adopted the model of a magical internet blockchain robot to explain some of the more advanced capabilities of the decentralized web. …

About

Cameron Rout

Product Manager at Google | Crypto Enthusiast

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