📆 Today’s tip: To make any transition, set a deadline and work backwards.

If you haven’t yet seen Forge’s five-day course, What Should You Really Be Doing With Your Life?, by Felicia C. Sullivan, your tip for the day is: Check it out. In the course’s last installment, Sullivan offers a strategy for anyone looking for a concrete way to make a change:

Set an end date for your current role — whether you’re looking to move, transition, or evolve your job in your current company or leaving it — and create an action plan by working backwards from that…


🤔 Today’s tip: Ask yourself, “How am I feeling today?”

We have apps and devices to track our steps, our sleeping hours, the time we spend staring at screens, and the progress we make on our daily tasks. But as Manoush Zomorodi notes in Forge, when it comes to measuring emotional well-being, there’s no substitute for the good old-fashioned check-in.

“At the end of the day,” Zomorodi writes, “no gadget can reflect how well I dealt with my anxiety over my to-do list; how satisfied I am with my execution of the tasks on said list; or whether I felt…


💬 Today’s tip: When you’re feeling stuck, talk through the problem out loud.

Yes, we mean talking to yourself. And yes, it’s going to feel weird at first. But as Kate Morgan points out in Forge, giving voice to your internal monologue is a research-backed strategy for improving your cognitive processing abilities.

“You understand the concept if you’ve ever walked around the house going, ‘Car keys… where are my car keys?’” Morgan explains. Struggling to find the perfect phrasing for that email to your boss? Gearing up for a hard conversation with a friend? Find some quiet space and start…


Hi there,

Today, we’re excited to share an extra tip with you: On Thursday, March 11 (that’s tomorrow!), Medium is hosting “The Purpose of Power,” a live Zoom conversation between Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza and ZORA Editor-in-Chief Vanessa De Luca.

Garza, whose latest book offers a blueprint for how to disrupt the systemic and institutional racism that plagues Black America and bring about transformative change, will answer questions about what constitutes a movement, how to create coalitions around causes even when everyone doesn’t always agree, and the importance of purpose-driven leadership in these turbulent times.

The event starts…


In Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s interview with Oprah yesterday, Harry explained where things stand between him and his brother, Prince William — and his answer was a reminder that…


Photo: Caravan Images/Getty Images

My dog does this thing sometimes where she eases her way into trouble. Whenever a pillow or table leg catches her eye as particularly chewable, she’ll mash her face against it and rub her nose back and forth, maintaining eye contact the whole time, as if to say: Just sniffing, can’t be mad. Often, she spends so long on this weird little preamble that by the time I notice she’s progressed to actually gnawing whatever it is, there’s already a hole in it.

We have a lot in common, in that this is also my preferred strategy for writing anything.


Photo: Alexi Rosenfeld/Contributor/Getty Images

Most of us enter January on the life equivalent of a Red Bull high: amped, but in an intense, jittery way that inevitably leads to crash.

In almost everything else, some kind of slow, measured warm-up is considered good form — you rehearse before a speech, train before a marathon, tinker with an email before hitting send. You don’t start a year cold if you want to do it right. Which is why Mollie Chen, the founder of Birchbox, recently suggested a small calendar tweak in her newsletter: Think of January as the staging area for the year, a time…


In a recent Medium post, kelly corrigan reminds us that in a real friendship, hard feedback and kindness are sometimes the same thing—with the tough stuff, yes, but also when it comes to less weighty decisions. We’re all going through enough as it is; do you really want to be the downer who reminds your friend what happened the last time she tried to give herself bangs? Or who listens to the story of a dumb fight and says that actually, it kind of sounds like their partner was the reasonable one? …


✅ Today’s tip: For your next important task, choose “event time,” not “clock time.”

Research has shown that people tend to think of time in one of two ways: “People in cultures that operate on clock time schedule their lives according to, well, the time on the clock,” David Kadavy writes. “Those who work on event time, on the other hand, run their days by responding to what’s happening: When I’m hungry, I’ll eat lunch. This meeting will end once we’ve met the objective.

If your goal is to get something done quickly, Kadavy explains, clock time is the way…


✅ Today’s tip: Divide your reading into three categories: current events, historical context, and fun.

If the past year has sapped your ability to focus on more than a few sentences at a time — and no, doomscrolling doesn’t count — here’s a plan to be a better reader in 2021: Be more intentional about the purpose of each thing you read. We suggest sorting your reading material into things that help you stay informed, things that use the past to help you understand our current moment, and things that you simply enjoy spending time with.

📚 More from Forge…

Cari Nazeer

Lead editor, Forge @ Medium

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