Hiatus.

Where now?

After just over one year of posting (on average) a blog entry each week (hitherto, via Tumblr), I have decided it is time to reassess the content and purpose of my blogging. Considering my life in IT and media/business, I was relatively late to blogging, being somewhat cynical of its purpose and relevance; but, since joining Medium, this has confirmed my original suspicions: I believe it’s time to try and write more of substance. Content that is original — not just blog about the same recurring topics.

Of course, therein lies the challenge: so many people blog about topics such as Facebook, Twitter, entrepreneurs/startups, economics, et al, because it’s so bloody easy. That’s not good. The corollary being that finding a different angle is not easy. That’s good.

Over the period of the past one year I have covered pretty much every topic that intrigues, enthuses or enrages me: politics, economics, social media, information technology, startups, venture capital, pop music, philosophy, anthropology, baking, nature, art, etc

That’s enough, for now. It’s often been little more than cathartic; sometimes it’s been enlightening (for myself at least) by virtue of the research required for a given topic. It’s pretty much always been draining and often left me with a feeling of ‘OK, now what?’

I would spend hours finding suitable hyperlinks and quotations for most of my blog entries; at times I suspect this often compromised the objective of the writing. So, it’s time to reassess.

Blogging is often little more than a pyrrhic victory over a blank web page. Why do you think embedded-media is so popular within blogs? As with tabloid newspapers it pads-out the copy and painfully strives to give some substance to something which is by its nature pretty transient and vacuous.

However, at this juncture, I see little added-value in blogging further about topics already extensively covered by myself and many (many) others; especially when many of the views are the same, albeit with a slightly different lexicon. Life’s too short for repetition.

See you soon.

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