Hamburger Menus are bad

I was looking through medium articles about UX/UI and came across this article: https://uxplanet.org/great-alternatives-to-hamburger-menus-d4c76d9414dd#.r79qne9fl

It gives examples as to why you should not be using hamburger menus and how there are different alternatives to the hamburger menu which got me a little confused because I always thought they were so great for UX/UI.

I guess, I was so wrong.

Studies show that it is actually more ineffective to use a Hamburger Menu and are actually less effective than what you actually think and a lot of applications use this method too. After doing more research, I learned why hamburger menus should be left in the past and to use more affective methods.

Low Discoverability

First of all, you can’t see them! If you’re not curious to press on the button, you never will and if you’re not into technology and just an everyday user, your first instinct might not be to press on 3 little lines and it opens up a menu.

Facebook Friends Menu — This is even weirder, it’s a hamburger icon with the friends icon and you’re just supposed to assume that it opens up a side nav with all your facebook friends. Not very effective.

Top right corner opens up a the Friends menu but

Not a good design pattern —

The design of the hamburger icon is random. If you’re not used to seeing it, you won’t know what to do with it and it clashes with other design patterns.

Less Efficient —

When someone uses a hamburger menu and you’re on mobile, you’ll still have the extra tap to open up the menu, look for what you want and then get redirected to where you want to go. It is an extra step for the user and it’s not efficient enough for them to stay interested. A way that people have avoided using hamburger menus is by using a sidescroller that opens to the different important parts of the application or using tabs instead.

Conclusion

When designing for mobile, it’s best to use the hamburger menu as the last line of defense when creating your navigation in your site. Users gravitate to sites that are designed well that are easy to use. Reading on hamburger menus has shown me that it’s the least efficient way to hide information.

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