By Caroline Adams Miller, MAPP, PCC

In 2019, the Internet exploded with admiration for Miss Nigeria, Nyekachi Douglas, when she leapt into the air and did a happy dance as her close friend, Miss Jamaica, beat out both her and the other semi-finalist to win the Miss World title. Seeing a woman genuinely exulting in another woman’s good fortune — even to her own detriment — was apparently so extraordinary that comments poured in on international media for days.

“In 2020, when your friend starts a new business, podcast, therapy, anything that enhances their life, be her Miss Nigeria,” wrote one. …


The pictures on social media of college students congregating and partying with impunity, and without masks, are currently crowding the airwaves. Their behavior is being criticized, by school administrators, the news media, and observers, as thoughtless and self-centered.

College students are not the only people during the coronavirus pandemic who are having trouble delaying their immediate gratification, regardless of the known negative impact their behavior has on others. …


In September 1961, 24 women gathered at the Radcliffe Institute in Cambridge, MA to start a year of intellectual study and focus on producing personal works of art, poetry, theology, philosophy, sculpting and writing. This “messy experiment” was designed to see if giving talented women money, lodging and access to stimulating academic opportunities in the company of similar women would spark their creativity while freeing them of the burdens of housekeeping and childcare that were weighing them down, devouring their time, and suffocating their dreams.

The announcement of the program’s inception to the public in 1960 wasn’t universally positive, though…


“A client of mine says she is mad about the coronavirus restrictions,” a therapist noted during a webinar I recently hosted. “How can grit help her in this situation?”

The therapist’s question touched on something that I’ve been pondering for weeks. Although “grit” is the word we often see being used to describe the heroism of frontline responders, I believe that there is a different type of grit that might be even more important right now for us to pay attention to because of its capacity to change lives, and even our culture, in momentous and overdue ways: “compassionate grit.”


Working from home can be a productivity challenge, but these research-backed tips can help you during the coronavirus closings.

When I first started writing “Creating Your Best Life” (Sterling 2008), the first evidence-based goal-setting book for the mass market, I ran into an immediate problem: I couldn’t write from my home office — a place where I’d successfully run every aspect of my company for years. Given the difficult deadlines the publisher had given me, I knew I was in trouble and that I had to solve my problem fast. …


I was a young girl when I first learned that goal success involved body, mind, passion, intention and confidence. At the age of eight on a hot summer afternoon, my father decided to inspire me with the story of my grandfather’s brothers, Platt and Ben Adams, who competed in the 1908 and 1912 Olympics.

Platt was in second place going into the final round of the standing high jump in Stockholm, Sweden in 1912. His brother, Ben, was third. …


Boeing didn’t learn from the goal-setting mistakes Ford made on the Pinto, but had they heeded values and science over greed and impatience, it’s unlikely that hundreds of people would have died. Lion Air Boeing 737-MAX8; @CGK 2018 (31333957778).jpg

In the 1960’s, the Ford Motor Company was riding high on the success of their sexy Mustang car. No one was prouder of it than the bombastic Young Turk, Lee Iacocca, who had overseen its creation and was determined to ride the car’s popularity to the company’s top spot.

Two things stood in his way: Semon “Bunky” Knudsen, the company’s current president, and Ford’s reluctance to compete with the popular European and Japanese subcompacts that were flooding the US market. …


A few years ago, a male client of mine asked me to write a letter of support for his application to be one of the “top 40 under 40” professionals in a specific sphere of business. Not long after that, a man I barely knew brazenly asked if I would sponsor him for an exclusive country club membership. Yet another man hit me up within a week of first meeting him to vote for him in a magazine contest to be the “best” in his profession.

I recall being a bit taken aback by the chutzpah of these men, who…


Credit: Adam Martignetti on Flickr

A few years ago, a male client of mine asked me to write a letter of support for his application to be one of the “top 40 under 40” professionals in a specific sphere of business. Not long after that, a man I barely knew brazenly asked if I would sponsor him for an exclusive country club membership. Yet another man hit me up within a week of first meeting him to vote for him in a magazine contest to be the “best” in his profession.

I recall being a bit taken aback by the chutzpah of these men, who…


For several years, I drove past the signs directing me to the Flight 93 Memorial in Shanksville, PA, the site where one of the doomed airliners was driven into a barren field by passengers who knew that the fate of the United States government possibly lay in their hands. Hurried calls on the morning of September 11, 2001 from some of the passengers on UA93 to loved ones had alerted them to the fact that they were part of a terrorist plot to wreak havoc and hatred on the United States, and that their flight was headed towards the U.S…

Caroline Adams Miller, MAPP

I help people get more grit, achieve their goals and find happiness!

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store