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Illustration by Becky Scheel

It is no doubt that the current situation we are living in has transformed how we experience services. In some cases, it has accelerated the adoption of new service interactions such as:

As a service designer observing how society, in general, is reacting and experiencing the “new normal”, I have noticed that when sharing content with others and collaborating over video calls, I end up feeling mentally exhausted.


Um Artigo de Cada Vez

Como dissemos no artigo que apresentava o projeto, Lusofonia é uma porta aberta a todos os Service Designers que falam em língua Portuguesa e que vivem fora do seu país de origem. Mas também, é uma porta que se abre a nós próprios, oferecendo-nos a oportunidade de os conhecer e de ficar a saber sobre o seu percurso nesta área. Efetivamente, desafiámos cada uma das pessoas que entrevistámos a partilhar a sua história convosco, um artigo de cada vez.

Hoje temos o gosto de partilhar a história da Carol Massa.

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Carol Massa

Oi, malta ! Meu nome é Carol Massa, sou luso-brasileira e sou designer de serviços em Atlanta, GA, EUA. Atualmente, trabalho em uma empresa de consultoria de design chamada Harmonic Design, onde tenho tido a oportunidade de explorar o trabalho de design de serviços por completo! Gostaria de começar compartilhando com você o que aprendi até agora…


A bit of context before we get started

For those who land for the first time in this publication, Lusofonia, mention that it is one of the initiatives that the Portugal Chapter at the Service Design Network is putting together to make 2020 the year of the community.

Lusofonia is an open door for all the Portuguese-Speaking Service Designers in the diaspora willing to connect with the Service Design community in Portugal to share their ideas, projects, lessons learned on how it is to work with a different culture. Plus, and more importantly, an opportunity to learn from and with peers.

Today we are excited to introduce you to Carol Massa, she will share with you her journey into Service Design. …


One of the greatest moments of my 2019 was that I had the opportunity to take a backstage tour at Walt Disney World where I’ve learned from them what makes their experience so magical for Guests and Cast Members (aka employees).

backstage magic tour badge
backstage magic tour badge

My first idea for this blog post was to describe the highlights of the tour and what they represent in service design terms, but the more I thought about this post, the more I realized that I had to investigate a little further and think about what I actually saw and what it means to me as a Service Designer. So, I decided to take a step back and dig deeper into what I’ve experienced.


Service design, at its core, tailors interactions between consumers and service providers through mediums that are designed to deliver a service experience. Our work as service designers, is to connect internal and external actors across business ecosystems. In order to get there we constantly experiment and explore multiple pathways to solve for the interactions mentioned above. It is through prototyping that we experiment and build our creative muscle. By doing that, we allow people to experience a possible future representation of what we are designing for.

Prototyping techniques in service design go beyond the definition that you usually hear about in the marketplace. These techniques rely on a combination of academic principles with real-world experiments that are able to demonstrate actionable business results. I’ll go over some examples that in some shape or form, prototyping has provided value to those who interacted with it. …


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FusionConf UX Edition in Charlotte, NC brought together +100 professionals on April 12th, 2019

This past week, I had the opportunity to speak at FusionConf UX Edition in Charlotte, NC, where I met not only UX designers ranging from start-ups to working in large organizations, but also non-designers who were looking for ways to understand more about what design is, what methodologies we use in our everyday work, and what design brings to the organization. The theme of the conference was “methodologies” and my talk was entitled “the role of service design in organizations.”

When I first thought about the theme, my main challenge was to find ways to explain to UX designers what the difference between what they do and service designers do. The more I thought about it, it became clear to me that our differences were based on perspectives. As the conference went on, we heard from speakers the different methodologies that exist inside the UX discipline and the role of a designer in organizations overall. All in all, the main insight noted throughout the day was: design is at a point in organizations where we are asked to be at the table, encouraging people to think differently about what they do and the value that is being provided among actors in a business ecosystem.


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The complexity of a collaborative effort inside and outside organizations defines the challenging landscape of our present time. At the same time, the design practice is constantly evolving and design professionals keep finding new ways to address the ‘complexity-and drama-of times’ in which we live in through new ways of transportation, new products/services, new digital experiences. In a particular note, one thing that has always kept me being truthful to the practice is the ability to utilize our abstract ways of thinking to illustrate (in multiple shapes, forms, dimensions) what others consider to be real or understandable.


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This story was inspired by my latest business trip where I stayed at a Marriott hotel. I was also lucky enough to get to know more about hotel business models through a friend who is in the hospitality industry. The comments below are all based on personal experience.

Have you ever stopped to think about the moving pieces inside a hotel that shapes your experience from the moment you decide to book a hotel room all the way after you check out?

What is interesting about the question above is that, each person is going to answer that question differently. The reason why that happens is because each person creates their own bias about what you are expecting from that experience. …


Before I start, I want to frame your expectation about the thoughts addressed below. They are based on my own experience and the resources I’ve been exposed to so far. Feel free to add comments below, I would like to know your feedback so that I can grow as a designer and contribute to my field of practice.

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I have always been fascinated by the Arts and Crafts movement and how Arts and Design started as one and throughout history they’ve evolved and became their own thing. I’ve started my professional career in the fashion design industry and slowly moved to visual communication design and I found myself today in the world of service design. …

About

Carol Massa

Designer at heart. Always looking for ways to improve my practice. Designing for complex organization challenges. Service Designer at @thisisharmonic

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