Taking the Aha! out of being Rich

The desire to be rich becomes a priority for many people, especially for those who are poor. There are many people who max out their credit cards, just to wear top of the line clothes, buy name brand footwear, and carry name brand purses, even though they may not have .10 cents in the bank, or may not even have a bank account. I have seen people selling food stamps just to buy a zirconia, a look alike diamond ring, and filling their mouths with six or more gold teeth. All to impress someone else, to make others think they are rich, or that they have made it to the top. It’s astounding to see children wearing a 200.00 dollar pair of shoes, but have no food to eat.

In a blog: It is more important that others THINK they are rich than to actually be rich. oldehippy99 ·

Is t.v. responsible for this? the advertisements that send subliminal messages: to be somebody, you must wear a certain brand name? we know that the answer is “yes” are we that easily influenced? what happen to common sense? and it didn’t make it any better when the slogan came out: “fake it till you make it”

if you can be poor and still have what rich people have; if you can experience being rich without actually being rich; where’s the aha! it’s easy to know who is who, and not all poor people faking to have money live in the projects; but what I have noticed is that there are some signs that reveal some truths about those who are truly rich and those who may be faking it:

those who are truly rich, rarely talk about it; but those who are faking it, constantly talks about what they have, constantly want others to see what they have; constantly talk about money that is basically nonexistent; and tend to borrow money from people who have less than they do, to make payments on that expensive car; they are also loud, and disrespectful, and they don’t seem to realize that no one really cares, and no one says “aha” when they come rolling down the street in that new car, or whenever they smile to show off those seven gold teeth.

If you are copying the rich, the first thing to do is make sure your children are fed. Rich people feed their children. In other words, Instead of spending 200. dollars for brand name shoes, buy some food for your children.

Now for tips on looking rich without the money to go with it.

1. It’s better to have a big wardrobe of beautiful form-fitting items of mysterious origin, than one blingy Coach bag that made you broke.

2. Make sure your clothes are always well-pressed and clean. It’s important to have good clothes, but it’s even more important to have clothes that look good and are well-kept.

3. Keep your shoes very clean at all times

4. A little jewelry cries out “rich” too much of it says “I’m faking it”do what lots of the wealthy do, get the cheapest, simplest Timex with a basic black leather band, small and discreet.[

5. An authentic designer bag or wallet is nice, but go for something a bit bland or obsolete.

6. Use natural makeup colors. A wealthy woman’s makeup should be natural; making use of neutral colors and gentle foundation. No over-the-top cat eye-liner, or false lashes. Keep it tasteful.

7. Grooming: Take good care of your skin; use a loofah to exfoliate while you’re in the shower. Get rid of dead skin cells to deep clean your skin and keep it healthy. Natural skin color looks much better.

8. Take care of your nails. Short tips can be classy and rich-looking, but longer nails tend to look a little cheaper and more fake.

9. Make your smile look like a couple million bucks.

10. Smell like money; wear a small amount of a subtle and sophisticated scent. Woodsy, floral scents are always classy, while sugary scents tend to scream out “young” or “bought at the mall.”

11. Wealth comes with elegance. If you want to act like you’ve got money, you need to practice good manners at all times.

12. Stay calm and avoid raising your voice when you’re upset. Learn to speak calmly and evenly, even if someone is pushing your buttons. Stand up straight and hold your chin up. Excellent posture, both when sitting or standing, are signs of wealth.

13. Get informed about the world around you. Brush up on general knowledge, but don’t flaunt your education or claim to be an expert. Get informed by checking out the following periodicals of the wealthy:

Forbes

Barron’s

Wall Street Journal

The Robb Report

Affluent Traveler

The New Yorker

The Economist

14. Act rich online. Richness sometimes has a very particular presence online. Cruise around websites like “White Whine” and “First World Problems” for good examples of how the 1% conduct themselves on Facebook and Twitter.

15. Don’t flaunt it. Rich people, really rich people, don’t feel the need to talk about how much they have. Rich people are probably the least interested in their own wealth. If you want to give the impression that you’re well-off, it’s important to pull back a little and let other people guess. Don’t push your “wealth” on people.

16. If the topic of money comes up, brush it off. If you’re pushed, you can say something like, “I don’t really like to talk about it,” or “I’m pretty comfortable.”

17. It is not just the clothes/car that can give away a person’s wealth. It is an attitude. Do NOT be snobby or rude to people. Do not wear bling or designer trendy labels that scream expensive.

Bonus: so what makes a person look rich? it’s not the bling, or specific

brands, fabric, particular style–it’s tailored clothes. If you want to look

rich, you need to make sure your clothes fit like they were made for

your body.

citations

http://www.thegloss.com/2014/06/21/fashion/cheap-ways-look-rich-summer-pictures/http://intothegloss.com/2014/05/how-to-look-rich/

http://www.wisebread.com/how-to-look-rich-without-having-much-moneyhttp://nypost.com/2014/12/08/magazines-for-the-mega-rich/http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-2599570/Virtual-reality-star-Kim-Kardashian-slammed-fans-passing-Google-image-beach-Thailand-own.htmlhttp://www.wikihow.com/index.php?title=Look-Rich&action=credits

How to Look Rich

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