To Survivors: We See You, We Hear You, and We Stand Prepared to Support You.

We are in an unfortunate societal climate of not believing survivors and focusing on the few while silencing the many. Center on Halsted demands change through an unapologetic pledge to support survivors by believing them first and offering our services.

The Anti-Violence Project at Center on Halsted works to empower LGBTQ communities and allies to be free from all forms of violence through free counseling, resource linkage, advocacy, education, and community engagement. To survivors: We see you, we hear you, and we stand prepared to support you.

Survivors frequently share stories with us about not being believed, the fear this creates, and the harmful impact not being believed has on reporting, seeking help, and recovery.

It is very rare for survivors to fabricate stories of hate violence. It is even rarer for LGBTQ survivors of hate violence to feel supported and heard.

The truth is that incidents and severity of hate violence is on the rise, and LGBTQ people of color are especially at risk. NCAVP recorded 52 reports of hate violence related homicides in 2017, the highest number ever recorded in the 21 years of collecting data and an 86% increase in single incident reports compared to 2016, with 71% of victims being people of color. NCAVP also documented an increase in the severity of hate violence in 2017 with 46% of survivors sustaining injury compared with 31% in 2016.

We lift up the stories of transwomen of color murdered in Chicago over the past year. The murders of Ciara Minaj Carter Frazier and Dejanay Stanton are a stark reminder of the violence facing LGBTQ people of color in Chicago.

If you are currently feeling unsafe, targeted, or isolated we can help. We are available Monday — Friday from 9am-5pm via our resource line (773–871–2273) and email (avp@centeronhalsted.org). Our services can also be accessed via our no appointment needed, walk-in hours on Monday and Friday from 10-noon.