Are we designing for children? An analysis of infantilisation from a design perspective.
Are we designing for children? An analysis of infantilisation from a design perspective.
Photo by Vanessa Bucceri on Unsplash

Back in 2006, I found myself organising piles of documents to start my first year of practice as an art teacher. I was part of a special program created by Fidel Castro himself to “Make Cuba the most cultured country in the world”. These programs included art schools from all over the country to prepare new generations of art teachers with the mission to educate the country on music, dance, theatre, visual arts and of course, politics. In a communist country with a single accepted ideology and narrative, this was always part of the deal.

But it is 2020, so let’s avoid politics for the sake of our mental health and go back to the story of this article. I had to prepare two different training programs. One designed for my classes in the mornings, teaching children ages 5 to 10 and another program for the evening schedule, covering a wider age range, from teenagers to adults. Despite being trained for four years to be in front of a class and having built a full art program covering history of art, drawing basics, colour psychology and more, designing two programs at the same time was as interesting as challenging. …


From Purpose to Planning. It is not Rocket Science.
From Purpose to Planning. It is not Rocket Science.

Purpose, mission, principles, vision, strategy, plan. The world is full of fuzzy words, overused to the extent of losing their original meaning. However, regardless of how they are used today, my approach is not to dismiss these words but to rescue them by respecting their meaning, using them intentionally, and -maybe- writing about them. …


Design for coherence rather than consistency.
Design for coherence rather than consistency.

If we ask any design system advocate what are the main reasons to build and maintain a design system, chances are ‘Consistency’ will come up as first or second in their list, together with the ‘A single source of truth’ point, which is pretty much saying the same, with different words. This reasoning is valid but incomplete, and it could lead to a wrong product strategy and overall poor results.

Consistency in Design is the Wrong Approach

There are 3 major problems with a ‘consistency focus’ approach:

1. It is artificial. When designing for consistency, we are not only ignoring our users but focusing on administrative and maintenance tasks instead. Nothing can’t be further from the real purpose of a human-centred system. Uniformity might look good on paper, but it is boring, disconnected from the real use cases, and most importantly, it is inefficient. …

About

Product Design Lead, freethinker, illustrator, ukulele player, surfer, photographer, avid reader and occasional writer. 🇨🇺🇪🇸🇪🇺 www.iamcharlie.design

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store