BUILDING BUSINESS MUSCLE | CHELF ft. LYNCHPiN

Entrepreneurial savviness grows through sheer determination. Having the balls to start something new, difficult and scary, falling down and getting up again, trial and error, late nights full of frustration and ambition.

THIS IS HOW YOU BUILD YOUR BUSINESS MUSCLE.

Just like your biceps and triceps there are no shortcuts, no magic potions no Romes build in a day. You need to work on your stamina, pushing harder each day, breaking your own records as you adopt a resilient attitude.

5 KEY-POINTS

Before you accuse me of a cliché…wait, no, you’re right, go ahead and accuse me because it is indeed a cliché. An unavoidable one though. And it happens to be true. So, before you accuse me of starting with a cliché, allow me to start with a cliché. You have to put your energy into the field that excites you the most, otherwise you will fail to find motivation, hence setting yourself up for failure.

Even if you have to do two jobs to be able to support that endeavor, do it.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: Given the nature of my job, I spend most of my days surrounded by musicians. All of them have to suffer through the subjectively defined concept of being a nine-to-fiver, in order to support their career in music.

CORRECTION: Power through, not suffer through. Because when you have a grand goal to work towards the suffering lessens and it’s all worth it. Despite the fact that they come to me to complain about the tedious task of slicing cheese behind the deli counter all day, it’s 100% worth it.

“The what can I bring to the table mindset”

Stop looking for what other people have to offer you. Start asking yourself what you have to offer. Have an impact. Make yourself valuable. Stop taking start giving. I’m not suggesting to implement some sort of unrealistic act of selflessness. You will get loads in return. Especially at the beginning of your business endeavors, you need to do the extra mile, give more than expected and surprise others pleasantly to earn respect, gain experience and establish yourself in the industry.

It’s also a great way to get a good understanding of your strengths and weaknesses. Sure, there will be a few leechers along the way, but try to think cool thoughts to eliminate the negative internal chatter, as you walk away from these people.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I used to be a full-time chef. As the blog took off, I was offered more and more writing jobs, photoshoots, band and music related content creation, collaborations with awesome brands and awesome bands. I never hesitated to do the extra work, lower my fees even, to accommodate to each client’s needs, do free work on occasion and in a nutshell bust my arse to make sure I was giving these people who put their trust in me the best of me. Even if that means sleepless nights, outstanding amounts of stress and traumatic adventures. For me building a strong business muscle came with a lot of pain, hard work and plenty of battle scars. And I wouldn’t change a single fcking thing.

Don’t be afraid of reinvention. Or be afraid but keep going despite the fear. Fight don’t flight. Don’t be risk-averse to avoid failure.

Take your plan A. Start working on it. If it doesn’t work out well for you, pause, re-evaluate, and start again. Don’t think of changes as draining but as potential break through moments.

Do you ever wonder what this world be like if we were a bit more adaptable and embraced change? Fear is holding us back. Especially if we’ve built our entire personality around our profession. What are we left with, without that label?

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: Who am I under my chef’s coat? How do I step down from a job that defines me and what’s my identity without it? I was terrified. But, I’ve found that if you are truly passionate about something you will find a way to introduce it into your new business path. Now, besides working with awesome bands and awesome brands, I also work as a freelance chef to create recipes and food related content for various companies. It turns out I did not have to choose one or the other. I can do both, as long as I want to. Where does that leave my identity? I don’t need to be labeled as a “chef” or a “band manager” or a “content creator”. I’d like to be labeled (if I must) as a high resilient, hard worker.

Learning when and where to say no, is crucial. Just as crucial as learning when and where to say yes. When in doubt ask yourself: What’s holdng me back? Does that job or opportunity has nothing to offer me or am I scared I wont be able to complete the task properly? Fear driven “Nos” are the worst kind of nos. Say NO to fear driven Nos.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: I have a fairly good experience with editorial photoshoots. I’ve learned how to pose in front of a camera, what looks good and what doesn’t , I know how to communicate with the photographers and highlight the featured products in a subtle way. But when I was asked to be in a music video I was lost. My first instinct was to say a fear driven NO. Luckily I said yes and didn’t let the fear factor get the better of me. I invested all my thoughts and energy to the project, I listened carefully and took directions. I ended up having the best time. It doesn’t even matter whether the video turned out ok or not. Al it matters is that I did it.

Be honest about who you are, what you can or cannot do, and accept your weaknesses. The right clients will appreciate it. This is how you end up working with the best.

I call it work elitism and I’m very unapologetic about it.

I want to be eclectic and work with the best to become better myself. That Chelf-defined elite of clientele, has to know exactly who I am in order to become MY Chelf-defined elite of clientele.

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: This is my weakness. Exposing my weaknesses.

I must have some Russian blood in me (cheers to my Russian Chelflings, love you lots) because I instinctively prefer not to show emotion, breaking bones to present myself cool and collected and “god forbid” if I publicly admit to frailty.

That’s my honest sharing moment with you.

To you it may seem like a simple sentence but I typed, deleted, retyped several times.

I’m working on admitting my weaknesses to my clients. And this way, they are able to trust me more as it turns out. Moreover, they are able to offer extra guidance to those areas and give me a boost to achieve the best possible results. There. I said it. And we are still all alive.

This post is inspired from and created in collaboration with LYNCHPiN.

The most hard working and committed band I have ever met. I’m talking about massive waves of Caribbean brutality, not just a metal band but a whole lifestyle attitude. Constantly evolving through tireless work, gaining more and more global recognition, this is the perfect example of people building strong business muscle.

The Chelfdom vows eternal loyalty to those limit-pushing warriors.

Check out my “Would You Rather” interview with the band on MHF MAGAZINE here.

SHOP MY LOOK

Lynchpin merch

LOCATION:

Mi Me Lismoni Conceptual Flower Shop. Thank you for having us!

Hugs, to all of you.

Go build those muscles and don’t forget to visit the Chelfdom when you can. I’d love to hear your stories and insights. Love ya all.

Until the next one,

Chelf.


Originally published at www.chelf.net on March 4, 2019.