Researchers at UC San Diego created the largest maps of gene regulation to date, capturing the network of RNA binding proteins, the RNA sequences they bind to, and what the proteins do.

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Can you imagine organizing more than 10 terabytes of data into a useful network of information, like creating Google maps from scratch? I certainly can’t, but Eclipse BioInnovations, a San Diego-based biotech start-up, is aiming to do just that for RNA therapeutics.

Researchers at the University of California San Diego, who are also Eclipse co-founders, captured a high-resolution picture of the inner workings of gene regulation. They created the largest maps of the network of RNA binding proteins, the RNA sequences they bind to, and what the proteins do. The better resolution the map, the more researchers understand.

“By identifying where all the RNA binding proteins sit, the floodgates start to open for describing how RNA biology is modulated,” said Gene Yeo, Ph.D., MBA, Professor of Cellular and Molecular Medicine at UC San Diego and co-founder of Eclipse. “From a drug development perspective, we’ve laid out the largest landscape to date of almost 360 RNA binding proteins.” …


Your metabolism has a memory — and it can hold a grudge for years. Researchers turned to the epigenome to figure out how and why it does.

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Photo by Victor Josan on Shutterstock.

Yes, even your metabolism has a memory — and it can hold a grudge for years. In people with diabetes, periods of high blood sugar can negatively impact their health years later, even if they get their blood sugar under control. While this ‘metabolic memory’ phenomenon has been known for years, why it happens is poorly understood.

Rama Natarajan, Ph.D., Professor and Chair of the Department of Diabetes Complications & Metabolism at City of Hope, turned to our epigenome for the answer.

“We’ve shown the first link between DNA methylation in blood and stems cells, blood sugar history, and future development of complications,” said Natarajan. …


The immune response against the AlloPrime® vaccine can influence the response to a virus (like the coronavirus that causes COVID-19).

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Image credit: Dreamstime

Originally published: Jul 08, 2020

What if you could get one vaccine that protects you against a wide spectrum of viruses, even viruses we haven’t discovered yet? That might sound impossible and futuristic, but this is just what Immunovative Therapies and its sister company Mirror Biologics, Inc. are aiming to achieve. Their new ‘pan-viral’ vaccine called “AlloPrime ®” is slated to begin a Phase I/II trial next month.

“Our pan-viral vaccine harnesses the same protection mechanism that naturally protects us from viral diseases — a healthy immune system,” Michael Har-Noy, MD, Ph.D., Founder and CEO of Immunovative Therapies, told BioSpace. …

About

Chelsea Weidman Burke, M.S.

Biochemist turned science journalist. Alzheimer’s, immunology, immunotherapy, genetics, cancer. Follow my publication! https://medium.com/chemically-inquisitive

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