5 Reasons Collegiate Tennis Players Make Great Employees.

From the court to the office. In a competitive corporate world, tennis players stay ahead of the competition.

They work well under pressure.

Electing to compete in college is a decision many junior players do not make lightly. The pressure on a college student is at an all time high, and a busy athletic schedule adds weight to the balance. 
Additionally to balancing their work and athletic obligations, former college tennis players are highly capable of handling stressful situations under increased pressure. 
Tennis is an individual sport, and unlike football or basketball, there are often no team members to lean on in pressure situations. Need a presentation delivered to a room full of prospective clients? No issue for these employees. That’s nothing compared to facing match point in a conference clinching final set.

They possess the ability to push themselves with relentless drive.

Tennis players are relentless, they never give up. They could be facing match point, and still come out victorious. 
Collegiate players follow a strict schedule, and follow it religiously. Each time a player steps out on the court they are practicing learned movements over and over until mastery is achieved. 
The famous expression “practice makes perfect” is not around for no reason. Tennis players go through repetition and fine-tuning to ensure they see improvement, and this in itself is an invaluable trait within a workplace.
They will work persistently towards amelioration, and won’t stop until it is achieved.

They are teachable.

Obtaining an athletic scholarship is difficult, and tennis players didn’t get there alone. Tennis players do not shy away from criticism, and are highly adept at understanding instruction and converting it into results. 
Despite being an individual sport, college tennis is played as a team. Collegiate players are highly skilled in motivating teammates, and creating an environment where they can learn from each other. 
Entering the business world, former players understand how to interpret instruction, and are able to use their intuition in balance with their training to become a “superhero” employee. 
Their leadership qualities allow them to empathize with colleagues, and thus create a stellar working environment where defeat is not an option.

They are versatile.

There is usually more than one path toward success, and there is nobody who has a better understanding of this than a tennis player. 
Tennis is often compared to chess; a game of intellect and strategy. A tennis player can start a match 3–0 down with a failing game plan, and is able to quickly formulate a refreshed approach, which can see them quickly turn defeat into victory. 
A player already possesses multiple varying traits such as hand-eye coordination, speed, and quick thinking, but it is their refined ability to strategize under pressure which sets them apart from the competition. 
If one method isn’t working, they have multiple contingencies in place to achieve results, and can be relied upon to establish intuitive solutions when the idea well has run dry.

They can develop new skills, and are exceptional entrepreneurs.

Tennis is a sport requiring the most specialized physical and mental skills imaginable. Possessing a mere few skills alone is not enough to make the cut as a collegiate tennis player. Even throughout their collegiate careers, players are consistently developing new skills, and such ability to derive and conquer new abilities is unsurpassed in the business world. 
Many people from large corporate environments may have a tendency to be somewhat single-minded in their objectives within a company or business. The collegiate tennis player is strongly equipped to understand the bigger picture of what is required to hit long-term goals, just like the way they developed a particular shot or strategy within their game. 
This entrepreneurial outlook, and ability to think outside the box keeps them head and shoulders above the competition.

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