The Fisher King: Solving Climate Change in a Post-Truth World

  1. Climate change isn’t real
  2. Climate change isn’t caused by humans
  3. The magnitude of climate change is exaggerated
  • When the motivation to find patterns in the environment is experimentally heightened
  • Among people who habitually seek meaning and patterns in the environment
  • When events are especially large in scale or significant and leave people dissatisfied with mundane, small-scale explanations
  • When people experience distress as a result of feeling uncertain
  • Are anxious
  • Feel powerless
  • Lack sociopolitical control
  • Lack psychological empowerment
  • Experience ostracism
  • Have low status e.g. because of income
  • Are on the losing side of political processes
  • Have prejudice against powerful groups and those perceived as enemies
  • Are narcissistic — an inflated view of oneself that requires external validation and is linked to paranoid ideation

“Given its billion or so users, YouTube may be one of the most powerful radicalizing instruments of the 21st century.”

— Zeynep Tufekci

Want to know how Facebook’s categorised you? Click on “Settings” within your Facebook account, then on “Ads”, and explore the sections under “Your ad preferences”.

  • Use lay terminology to better interact with the public and avoid charges of elitism
  • Better elucidate issues of scientific uncertainty and climatic unpredictability by focusing on the known elements, including known minimum risk
  • Ensure peer review processes are transparent, accountable, and welcoming of healthy skepticism
  • Scientists must also become debaters and public speakers, by developing rhetorical skills
  • Scientists must be prepared to counter criticism actively rather than letting their research offer its own defence

“We don’t want any hoaxes on Facebook. Our goal is to show people the content they will find most meaningful, and people want accurate news. We have already launched work enabling our community to flag hoaxes and fake news, and there is more we can do here.”

— Mark Zuckerberg

  1. ^ Douglas, M., Karen, Sutton, M., Robbie & Cichocka, Aleksandra. (2017). “The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories”. Current Directions in Psychological Science, (pp 538–542).
  2. ^ Douglas, M., Karen, Sutton, M., Robbie & Cichocka, Aleksandra. (2017). “The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories”. Current Directions in Psychological Science, (pp 538–542).
  3. ^ Douglas, M., Karen, Sutton, M., Robbie & Cichocka, Aleksandra. (2017). “The Psychology of Conspiracy Theories”. Current Directions in Psychological Science, (pp 538–542).
  4. ^ van der Linden, Sander. (2015). “The conspiracy-effect: Exposure to conspiracy theories (about global warming) decreases pro-social behavior and science acceptance”. Personality and Individual Differences, (pp 171–173).
  5. ^ Bessi, Alessandro, Coletto, Mauro, Davidescu, Alexandru, George, Scala, Antonio, Caldarelli & Quattrociocchi, Walter. (2015). “Science vs Conspiracy: Collective Narratives in the Age of Misinformation”. Plos One.
  6. ^ Einstein, Levine, Katherine & Glick, M., David. (2014). “Do I think BLS data are BS? The consequences of conspiracy theories”. Political Behavior, (pp 679–701).
  7. ^ Bricker, Jacob, Brett. (2013). “Climategate: A Case Study in the Intersection of Facticity and Conspiracy Theory”. Taylor & Francis Online, (pp 218–239).
  8. ^ Wiebe, J., Todd. (2016). “The Information Literacy Imperative in Higher Education”. Association of American Colleges & Universities.
  9. ^ Bode, Leticia & Vraga, K., Emily. (2015). “In Related News, That Was Wrong: The Correction of Misinformation Through Related Stories Functionality in Social Media”. Journal of Communication, (pp 619–638).

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