Google released 1.9 and we celebrated with Russian pies. When we got back to the keyboard, we could finally finish up something pretty special — Golang is now available on our server-less compute platform, Red Sift, and it is a game changer.

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Kulebyaka is a Top 10 food for the gang here at Red Sift. Hence pie shot. Enjoy.

At Red Sift, most of our platform is written in Go and we love working with it. Yet, we had not officially released support for 3rd party code in Go on our server-less environment. Today, it’s here and we are taking the wraps off.

Settle in, we are going to build a mini Elastic Cloud in Go and run it on our own server-less computing platform.

This ain’t no hello world.

If you are new to Red Sift, our colleague Mike has previously posted on why we exist and what makes us different — I recommend you read it as…


TL;DR: Red Sift now enables you to create, deploy and share your serverless web services fast and simply

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Photo by Aziz Acharki on Unsplash

Often, having written a particularly nifty bit of code you want to share it with the world. Github and Gitlab are great for getting the code out, but what if you want to have a running demo as well?

Serverless computing platforms are great for hosting code without per minute charging and the hassle of setting up virtual machines, but current platforms, like Amazon Lambda, are limited in their choice of programming environment and language.


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Light and Shadow in the Carina Nebula. Credits: NASA

Today we are announcing beta availability of our platform, Red Sift. Over the last year, we have been working on our vision to Automate the Planet. We feel there is too much of a disparity between what technology can accomplish today and what normal human beings experience. We spend too much of our time and energy searching through data and performing robotic tasks all the while knowing that today’s technology holds within it the power to make our lives fundamentally better. If only there was a way for us to create automations and agents that can monitor the data we…


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Developers that specialise only in one language are a dying breed. Successful technologists need to master more than one, juggle many technologies and expand their toolsets significantly to maintain their edge. The same applies to organisations that need to keep adding ingredients to their technological stack to overcome new obstacles. Hence, it’s natural for their engineers to use the right tools for the task they need to accomplish and add more. However, managers can sometimes become reluctant, fearing that their mix of technologies might become too elaborate or peculiar. …

Chris Vontas

Engineer @Redsift. ex-(@thomsonreuters, MPme) Makes developers and servers happy!

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