Female Rappers to Look Out For

In lieu of XXL’s disappointing Freshman list, it’s time we highlight the real innovators of rap: Women. Female rappers are the forefront of the genre’s evolution, and women have been rewriting the rules and pushing the game to start expanding its boundaries, especially so now. Most people are familiar with Nicki Minaj and Cardi B, but there are plenty of new talents that deserve recognition as well.


Maliibu Miitch

I have to start off by highlighting the inspiration behind this post, South Bronx native Maliibu Miitch. From spitting over nostalgic New York beats and providing new-age anthems, with aspirations from becoming a top-charting rapper to one day maybe even the mayor of the Bronx, this 27-year old beauty is as dynamic as she is talented. Maliibu Miitch has been making music since her adolescent years — even previously signed to Ruff Ryders and Island Def Jam — but she’s now breaking through on her own terms.

Megan Thee Stallion

Perhaps the most underrated rapper on this list, Megan Thee Stallion lures you in with her undeniable sex appeal, makes you stay for her charged verses and fiery flows, and leaves you walking away with a renewed sense of confidence. With her recently released album “Tina Snow,” the H-town Hottie is ready to leave her mark on the scene.

Rico Nasty

Twitter’s been up in arms about Rico Nasty not being included in this year’s list. Maria Kelly’s “sugar trap” style — a punkish flair mixing rage with cutesy, cartoonish aesthetics — is difficult to describe, yet distinctive and captivating. Having recently gained traction, Rico Nasty is emerging from the underground scene ready to embark into mainstream rap.

Yung Baby Tate

Atlanta’s playful Tate Farris, or Yung Baby Tate, raps and sings over bubbly trap beats. Blending 90’s R&B with the current Atlanta sound, her smooth deliverance and Bratz-Doll like aesthetic, proves she is the freaky feminine icon that we all deserve. And in her words herself, “Tate is one artist to keep your eye on!”

City Girls

City Girls is a Florida duo consisting of J.T. and Yung Miami. These Miami girls have a raunchy, freaky, and sexy sound, reminiscent of Trina (Trina is Yung Miami’s godmother after all) or maybe even Khia. Despite having released only a handful of songs, this group is already signed to Quality Control. It’ll be interesting to see how these women plan on putting Miami back on the map.

Ms Banks

Twenty-three year old, South London’s Ms Banks caught people’s attention around 2014, and over the past year has toured with Cardi B and even recently gotten a shoutout from Nicki Minaj. Witty, intriguing, and aware, Ms Banks is prepared to utilize her penmanship to “take the South London sound global.”

Asian Doll

At first glance, you wouldn’t think the sweet-looking Dallas “Queen of Teens” would be as fiery as she is, but looks can be deceiving. The 21 year-old Texan has six projects of her own and is set to accompany Bhad Bhabie on her U.S. tour. Since catching people’s attention Asian Doll continues to prove with her snappy rhymes that she is not one to be messed with.

Bbymutha

Chattanooga’s Brittnee Moore decided to reclaim and adopt the moniker often used against her. Now bbymutha uses her music to discuss how she triumphs despite the challenges of being a single mother and dealing with men. Her unfiltered and nasty raps are surely making waves on the internet.

Bali Baby

Bali Baby, a North Carolina native now based in Atlanta is unapologetic and stark, and her melodious music packaged with jabbing insults is undeniably catchy.


Over the past two or three years we’ve seen an eruption of new female talent, signaling that there’s an intense desire for some refreshing acts. This post only features a handful of the many female rappers navigating the male-dominated industry; artists like Azealia Banks, Cupcakke the Rapper, Kash Doll, and more are equally talented and deserve recognition as well.

While female rappers have existed — and succeeded — throughout history and well before the emergence of any of these acts, in the grand scheme of things there have only been a small few that we remember leaving a legacy. Things are changing, and, well, don’t you think it’s time us ladies take charge?