The Eurosim Experience

By: Caitlin Joyce


What is Eurosim?

Eurosim is a club modeling after the European Union. Students involved in the club are assigned an alter-ego in the beginning of the year, and spend up until the conference preparing their assigned egos.

https://my.brockport.edu/organization/eurosim/gallery/album/80688

More than 200 students from around North America and Europe are involved in the conference. Each year, the conference switches from being held in the United States and various places in Europe.

For more information on Eurosim, click here and here.

https://my.brockport.edu/organization/eurosim/gallery/album/80688

History of Eurosim

30 years ago, The SUNY Brockport political science department decided to put faith in a new club that modeled the United Nations. While everyone had faith in it, no one truly expected the club to florish and prosper the way it has.

In 1987, students started what was called the European Community, a model simulation of the United Nations. The project was sponsored by the political science department.

With heavy preparation, the first conference was held in 1988, on the College at Brockport campus. The schools involved were other SUNY schools, and private schools from around New York State. The conference was called SUNYMEC (State University of New York Model European Community).

Conferences continued to be held around New York State, until 1992, when the conference was held in the little country of Luxembourg. In 1992 the name was also offically changed to Eurosim, and was considered a trans-atlantic exchange.

Ever since 1992, the conference has been held every other year overseas, some of the locations including Wroclaw, Poland, the Netherlands, and Antwerp, Belgium.

This most recent conference was the 30th anniversary of Eurosim, and Brockport claimed the conference once again, returning the club to its roots.

The prospective 2018 conference will be held in Brussels Belgium, and will take place during Brockport’s winter break.

Storymap

Eurosim to the Students

While Eurosim is a Brockport based club that has flourished into an trans-atlantic experience, the students involved truly do love the club.

Brockport Eurosim Students converse about Britain leaving the EU.

“My greatest memory was probably interacting with all the international students there. It was good to talk to people from a social aspect, from a different perspective,” stated Jacob Petote, a freshman here at SUNY Brockport.

“I always say when people talk about Eurosim, or ask about it, that it is the most beneficial program I’ve been in at Brockport. I’ve had some great teachers, I’ve had some great classes, but I’ve learned more in Eurosim, being an officer of Eurosim, helping plan European trips, meeting European students,” stated Rebecca Faulconbridge, a senior at SUNY Brockport.

For more student input on how Eurosim has effected them, click here.

How do I Get Involved?

The Brockport Eurosim club meets every Monday at 12:30 in the Hartwell political science confrence room. You can also email the president with more questions (here). You do not have to be a political science major to get involved.

To be eligable for the upcoming trip to Belgium, you much submit a five page paper to the advisor, Steve Jurek (sjurek@brockport.edu) by July 1st, stating why you deserve to be taken to Belgium.

The paper can consist of any reasoning; from your passion of European politics, to your outstanding communication skills and need for a more diverse learning experience.

Why Eurosim?

Eurosim, while it is easily one of the most interesting and diverse clubs on campus, is often looked over and not acknowledged. With it’s origins beginning at Brockport, Eurosim is a rich and thriving program that gives many opportunities and experiences to the people involved.

For any club across campus that you might find interesting, go and check it out. It might be a hidden gem in Brockport that makes your experience here worthwhile.

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