Why?

Why Do You Run in The Bike Lane?

Day 6–30 Days of Writing to Refresh my Mind

I Don’t Get It

Why do you run in the bike lane?

The lane looks clear and open. I get it.

There are no or at least fewer pedestrians (or tourists going to the Smorgasburg, if you’re on Kent Avenue in Williamsburg, Brooklyn) than on the sidewalk. I get it.

But it’s dangerous. It’s really, really dangerous. Do you get that?

You run in the bike lane. You run two, three, four or more across sometimes.

Some of you run with headphones. Some of you run with a dog.

Some of you run with headphones AND a dog.

I don’t get it.

Creating a Dangerous Situation

I fight the urge to make this about me, the cyclist. It’s really hard to do that though.

The bike lanes are built for bikes, right?

So why do you run in them?

Do you not care that you’re creating a dangerous situation? Do you not care you’re endangering cyclists and all those around you? Do you not care you’re putting yourself in danger, even?

Or do you think that we’ll see you? It’s on us? It’s the cyclist’s responsibility to avoid you, right?

You expect us to avoid you. You expect us to go around you. Some of you might run toward the edge of the lane, on the side.

That’s plenty of room for the bikes to get around you, right?

Some of you don’t even do that. Some of you run SMACK IN THE MIDDLE of the bike lane.

I really, really don’t get that.

Cyclists Can’t Be Expected to Anticipate Everything

What happens when you need to dodge something? Are the cyclists supposed to anticipate that?

What happens when you hit your stride, your zone, are feeling good and need to cross the street and forget to look? Are the cyclists supposed to anticipate that too?

How about when your dog darts left or right? How are we supposed to anticipate that?

We’re In This Together, Aren’t We?

You really shift the responsibility to the cyclist when you run in the bike lane. I can’t help but come back to how selfish that seems.

I’m working hard to break through the concept of duality in my mind. That’s a different story from a bigger perspective. I still can’t help but come back to how selfish it seems when you run in the bike lane.

I really can’t. I try not to but can’t get over it.

Aren’t We In This Together?

Please help me understand why you do it. Please help me get over it.

I get it. New York is a crowded city. We have to coexist. We have to make room for each other. You’re a runner and I’m a cyclist. We’re both working to improve our fitness.

We’re in this together, aren’t we?

I simply wish you could do it on the sidewalk, so both of us could do what we need to do in a safer environment. I know I’d enjoy a greater peace of mind. Wouldn’t you?

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