Image: cocopiesse Instagram.

Looking at • Maryam Nassir Zadeh SS 17 RTW

Maryam Nassir Zadeh consistently churns out looks and pieces worthy of perpetuating the habit of outfit repeating until adequately posted on Instagram.

Perhaps my favorite designer, each season is filled with covetable pieces of the most lovely hues. As usual, artist-model friends of MNZ model each look. Not usual was the presentation in which dozens and dozens of lovely vessels, vases and plates were smashed and stomped on with abandon. Though the objects may be broken and sharp, the clothing softly accentuates the feminine silhouette. MNZ has an adept aptitude for making the woman look both carefree and elegant with her designs that are suited to wear for all occasions and for the ages.

This season, the palette is neutral with the exception of a pop of coquelicot, in the form of a minimally full skirt, and a saturated honeydew woven bag — especially a standout as the only bag in the collection. These pieces are my favorite; the beautiful color choices no doubt playing an influence. Two of the looks have a watercolor print of vases though are forgetful compared to the others.

Coquelicot skirt. Image: Vogue.
Honeydew woven bag. Image: Vogue.

Along with the standard MNZ shoes that have since become ubiquitous, there are some new introductions that follow along her principles. New to the scene are a wedge sandal with both a wide vinyl overlay and thin leather strap, a low sandal with mesh overlay and a flat cross-strap sandal. Certainly, at least one of these will become another classic.

My favorite look consists of a soft, corn-yellow, cropped sweater set with cosmic latte lettuce edges. Perfectly complimented monochromatically with desert sand cullottes.

Monochromatic magic. Image: Vogue.

I don’t find the other looks particularly noteworthy though MNZ’s wearability factor is definitely constant. Was this a strong collection? With some standout pieces, it is favored but other seasons have fared better visually.

View the collection here.

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