5 Types Of Asian Drinks

Do you enjoy drinking and want to try something new and exotic?

Spice up your next party with a whole other world of drinks from Asia!

From Asahi to Tsingtao, from sake to soju, there are countless options for you to cool off this summer.

Here are a few…

1. Asian Beer

If you’re in the mood for an ice-cold beer, but tired of the same old Bud and Carlsberg, check out a beer from the Orient!

Japan ranks first in league, with familiar brands such as Asahi (“Japan’s №1 Beer”), Sapporo (“Japan’s Oldest Beer Brand,” founded in 1876), and Kirin (another Japanese favorite).

Tsingtao, China’s premier beer brand, is another solid choice.

If you’re a fan of everything South Korean, Hite Beer is the one for you!

2. Japanese Sake

Sake is a famous type of Japanese rice wine that is brewed similarly to beer. The ABV (Alcohol By Volume) is around 15–20%, making it a little stronger than wine.

As Japan’s national beverage, it is used in many traditional ceremonies and festivals.

It can contain flavor notes, such as fruits and spices, and can be served both warm and chilled.

Though this drink may come neat in a cup like a shot glass, it is actually meant to be sipped!

3. Korean Soju

Soju is basically the Korean version of sake, in that the two drinks have similar ABV percentages, and both are usually served in shot glasses, but meant to be sipped.

Soju, however, tends to be sweeter, with more fruity flavors. For example, Chum Churum, a popular soju brand, has flavors such as grape, pineapple, peach, and apple.

Another difference is that soju is distilled, not brewed like sake.

While people usually compare sake to wine, soju is more likened to a weaker version of vodka or whiskey.

Both spirits are clear or white, and have a distinct aroma.

4. Chinese Rice Wine (Bai Jiu)

A rather notorious choice is Chinese rice wine, otherwise known as “bai jiu.”

This drink is not for the faint of heart, as it is nearly as strong as whiskey!

It is the most consumed spirit in the world and is best served neat at room temperature.

5. Non-Alcoholic Mixers

At this point, you may be thinking…what if I don’t want to drink any of these straight? What mixers would make for good pairings?

Well, aside from the standard options such as soda or fruit juice, there is Lotte Chilsung Cider, the very first soft drink produced in Korea!

It tastes just like Sprite or 7Up, but more syrupy. Pair it with sake or soju for a combination that’ll hit the spot!

Other popular mixers in Asia include tea, ginger beer, tonic water, and cream soda, though of course, these are also enjoyed on their own.

Let me know which drink sounds the best, or which one you will be trying next! (My personal favorite is soju.)