You’re Fired!

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How to respond if you’ve been fired, laid off, closed your business or you just lost everything and need to start over.

In this video coaching newsletter, I discuss an email from a viewer who recently got fired from his job for reasons that really don’t make any sense to him. He’s now working to set up a situation where he leverages several job prospects to make more money, find a better job and turn his unexpected job loss into a victory for a better employment situation.

I discuss the importance of always trying to get better, even when things in life go sideways. How to master and apply a championship mindset to everyday setbacks, so you can use them as fuel to always find a way to improve the circumstances and people in your life. My comments are in bold italics like this below in the body of his email.

Hi Corey,

Bit of bad news to report, the company I was working at has terminated my employment after 6 weeks. Whilst there, I was positive, self motivated, gaining confidence, trying to be a bit better every day, asking questions on things I wasn’t sure on to ensure I got the job right, however near the end of the day, the boss said I was like “a square peg in a round hole, but had a good personality,” and it wasn’t any thing against me as a person. Also, he stated he had finished people on the grounds sometimes, that they could do the job, however “their personality didn’t fit.” I never took a day off and ensured I was in early, even catching up on jobs before my official start time.

Dude, that’s great news. He helped you create an opportunity in your life for something that’s better, more ideally suited to you. The reality is, sometimes you hire somebody and their personality is not quite right, people don’t like working with them or they’re just not cut out to do the job. It’s best for you and it’s best for the other person for you to part ways as quickly as possible, so you can create a space for the right person to come in, get on your bus, in the right position and do the right job.

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You’ve got to think about it from a career perspective. In other words, what’s good about this? What did you learn about this? Were you really, in your eyes, ideally suited for the job? Did you love every aspect of the job? Were you excited about it? What things did you love about it, and what things did you hate about it? If you had to do it all over again, would you still have chosen that job?

The key is to put yourself in a situation where you have lots of potential employers. You want to be the Lebron James or the Kobe Bryant that’s a free agent and has the opportunity to play with whoever they want to play for. In order to create a situation where you have lots of opportunity, that means you’ve got to talk to a lot of people, a lot of potential employers. You should be making a list with at least 50 or 60 employers, ranked in order of their desirability of where you want to work. Just start banging the phones and asking questions, as I talk about in my article and video “How To Get Any Job You Want.”

What’s the culture like there? What are the people like there? Is the company growing? I’m looking for a company that’s more stable. I’m looking for a company that has a training program, because in this case here, maybe they weren’t giving you the training or support you felt you needed. Maybe a company that is a little more structured and has a more regimented system of training is where you should go.

What do you want? Obviously, you want to take a position with a company where the culture is better, the people you work with are better, the money is better, the opportunity is better, it’s a more stable company, it’s growing and it’s more successful. That’s what you’re looking for, so you’re going to have to take the time and do the research, make a list of potential employers and then bang the phones.

Ask the receptionist questions. We all like to talk about ourselves and brag, so give your potential employers and investors a reason to brag about themselves to you, and why you should choose their opportunity over somebody else’s. The same thing with dating. That’s why asking questions is so powerful. Ask people the kinds of questions that they would enjoy answering.

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When you’re sincerely interested in somebody else, the longer you listen to them as they tell you about it, they’re going to think “I like this guy. This guy gets me. He really seems to care.” That creates rapport and makes them start to like you. As they start to like you, they start to trust you. When people like you and trust you, and they’re telling you how great their opportunity is, the next thing is them talking you into coming to work for them.

Then ask, what are you offering? What do you start out salary-wise, 401-k, benefits, opportunites for growth? What are the management opportunities? What are you looking for personally to achieve? You’ve got to have that list of those things written down going into it, so when you’re sitting in a interview, you can ask them. The idea is, you want to achieve your outcomes in your job where you’re working, and the only way you can achieve outcomes is if you know what they are and you write them down. Then you ask questions to the people who can potentially help you meet those outcomes.

The more you practice and rehearse it, the better you’re going to get at it. When you have choices, you won’t be so quick to run back to somebody that blew you off. The idea is to always better your situation. Always better your dating situation, always better your job situation. When you think every failure is an opportunity to get better, then losing your job and getting fired unexpectedly or getting dumped is not a big fucking deal. It hurts, it stings, but it means a bigger and better deal is coming down the road. That’s the way you should look at it. It’s a superior way to look at the challenges life throws us. Your goal is to get a little better every day.

I read your advice on your leveraging several job prospects. I tried to practice every day the positive things you mention on there. Whilst encountering adversity, I was accentuating the positive.

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To continue on a positive note, this will be another opportunity to do something else, and if I was only meant to be there for a short spell, I might as well go with flow. Things happen for a reason, and it looks likes my path in life is going to lead somewhere better.

Now you’re thinking. This is perfect. This is exactly what I’m talking about.

Thanks for the reply via Instagram regarding my last email, and thank you for the brilliant videos on dating. I will now endeavor to find another job.

Thanks for your support.
 Bob

It’s just a matter of time and repetition. It’s not a matter of hope of finding a better job. It’s a matter of practicing the fundamentals of getting a new job, talking to people who potentially have the opportunity and asking questions. Remember, the one asking questions is the one in charge of the conversation. If you’re perpetually in a state of being inquisitive, asking questions about everybody’s opportunity, from the receptionist all the way up to the CEO of the company, everybody you talk to is going to be trying to sell you on why you should choose their opportunity.


“Always seek to better your situation. If a deal goes sideways, put together an even better deal down the road. If you lose your job, seek to find a better, higher paying one. Scarcity creates value. Having multiple job offers makes it easy to choose the best one and make the most money. Having options gives you choices, superior leverage and the strongest negotiating position. Think of job hunting, investor hunting, client acquisition and dating prospecting as being a numbers game. The more people you talk to and interact with who can offer you what you are seeking, the quicker you will achieve your outcomes and find exactly the right people, circumstances and opportunities.” ~ Coach Corey Wayne
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