I’ve been browsing the web extensively for over 20 years. Over that time, I’ve learned keyboard shortcuts that have not only supercharged my productivity but also added style and flair to my desktop browsing experience.

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Photo by Caio from Pexels

This article is aimed for Mac users but the command (⌘) key is interchangeable with the control key on windows.

Number 1: Opening the developer tools and command menu

Shortcut: ⌘ + Option + I

This is the quintessential web developer’s shortcut. With it you’ll look professional. For those unfamiliar, it opens the chrome developer tools where you can see exactly what your browser is doing under the hood to render the page. …


The Fibonacci Point System

We employ the following point system in our sprints to size feature complexity and estimate velocity. Each point builds upon the previous point’s complexity requirements.

  • 1 — Small one line fixes, copy changes, or design tweaks.
  • 2 — Small logic changes with potential regressions.
  • 3 — Standard feature that often requires tracking and AB testing.
  • 5 — Larger features than 3 that usually involve creating new screens and components.
  • 8 — Very large feature that often requires significant refactoring or designing a new architecture.
  • 13 — Epics. Projects that are too large to scope. …


If you’re here reading this, then you’re probably stumped as to why you can’t use crtl-c or ctrl-v to copy and paste code into your terminal. You could use your mouse. But that’s not sleek.

Here’s the thing, the ctrl character when combined with other keys is used to send signals to your machine kernel. Think of them as override commands. Well, you can override your override keys by pressing the ctrl and shift keys at the same time. So:

To copy you, would press ctrl+shift+c
To paste you, would press ctrl+shift+v

Using pbcopy and pbpaste

You can go do the exact same thing in your Mac terminal with pbcopy and pbpaste. I use them everyday. Make it a habit and you will supercharge your productivity. …


If you use a JavaScript bundling library like create-react-app, webpack, or gulp to create your builds, you will have a build directory — typically build/ that you may want to host somewhere.

GitHub pages is an excellent place to host it since it’s free and can be directly integrated to your CI workflow, GitHub actions, or git hooks to automate this process. You can also do this manually by running this script whenever you feel comfortable publishing new updates to your website.

#!/bin/bash# Sync master branch and prepare staging branch. …


These are quotes that I’ve learned, live by, and revolve my values around. They have made me a wiser person with a greater sense of purpose, clarity, and direction.

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Photo by Simon Migaj on Unsplash

If it takes less than 5 minutes, do it now.

I was always fighting myself to do chores and simple things like flossing, brushing my teeth, and cleaning the dishes. Turns out I could spend an hour laying in bed doing nothing trying to avoid it. The first law of motion states: an object at rest will remain at rest unless acted upon an external force and an object in motion will stay in motion. …


This a story of why quantity matters just as much if not more than quality and why failing fast should be the status quo in education.

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Photo by Quino Al on Unsplash

On Spring of 2016, I learned about an experimental course called 100 Days in the Making offered by NYU ITP professor Katherine Dillon during a lunch-and-learn. She began her presentation by showing us a split photograph where on the left stood a lump of clay and on the right stood dozens of beautifully crafted pots.

Katherine told the story of how a high school teacher once held an experimental pottery class where the class was divided into two groups that would be graded differently. The first group would be graded based on the quality of their best pot while the second group would be graded based on the number of pots created. Katherine then asked us which group we thought would produce the highest quality pot. She took a tally and logically I raised my hand for the quality group — from my entire eighteen years in school, the most important thing I’ve been taught to focus on my whole life was quality and perfection. …


find . -maxdepth 3 -name .git -type d | rev | cut -c 6- | rev | xargs -I {} git -C {} pull

Breakdown

This command will find all git repos in your current directory with a max depth of 3. Afterwards it will perform a git pull on the current branch for each of those repositories.

Further Tips

First, I recommend creating a bash alias for this command. Add this to your .bashrc on Linux or .bash_profile on Mac. Then restart your terminal.

alias git-pull-all="find . -maxdepth 3 -name .git …


Newcomers to Bash programming will sooner or later come across /dev/null and another obscure jargon: > /dev/null 2>&1. It may look confusing but it’s fairly simple to understand and a fundamental part of shell programming. So let’s break it down with step-by-step examples.

To begin, /dev/null is a special file called the null device in Unix systems. Colloquially it is also called the bit-bucket or the blackhole because it immediately discards anything written to it and only returns an end-of-file EOF when read.

Let’s see what happens when we try writing to it with the file redirection operator (>).

# First let's try writing to this file.
$ echo 'text' >…


I’m starting a series on some of the git tips and tricks that I’ve learned during the half-decade that I’ve been using it. We’ll skip the everyday basics push, pull, log, status, diff, commit and start off with the fundamentals that will help you utilize the true power and convenience of version control.

Let’s begin by creating a .gitconfig file in your home directory. This file is the basis for all your git configurations, customizations, and aliases. In case you’re curious, I have posted a link to mine at the end.

[user]  
email = email@gmail.com
name = Jorge Yau
[core]
editor = vim
ignorecase =…


Slack is one my favorite reasons of why I love working at startups. As a disclaimer, these slack conversations are posted by my own volition. The tech team works extraordinarily hard and are exceptional at what they do. Without further ado, here are my favorite slack conversations at work that definitely put a tear or two in my eyes.

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Just one of the few ways to mess with your co-workers on slack.

About

Jorge Yau

Senior Web Engineer at Stash. I write about NYC, tech, and the immensity of life.

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