I’m Lucky

I am a lucky guy.

I don’t always make the best decisions. I have had my share of arguments with my girlfriend of a year and a half. I have had my share of arguments with my parents, but nobody hates me.

I am lucky. I have a very high IQ of 135. I go to a private high school, and I love to play sports and work hard to stay in shape.

My story started in early October, 1997. I wasn’t supposed to be born until the upcoming January, but my mom’s water broke.

The doctor’s said if I popped out on that day, I would have less than a 10% chance of living.

They drugged my mom for two weeks, with me finally being born on October 22, 1997, however, still three months premature. At that moment, I had about a 75% chance of living, which were much better odds than before. I was born at about two pounds.

My parents had to prepare for the worst though, I was too small to be anything but a vegetable for the entirety of my lifetime.

From the miracle of God, the worst thing I had was asthma until middle school.

I am healthy now. I am 5'9, 180 pounds of muscle (and a little fat, of course). I do well in school and I am set to graduate with honors from a prestigious private high school in Indianapolis next May.

I am lucky. I just read a story here on Medium about how some young woman lost her mother. That story inspired me to write this.

My mother was diagnosed with a brain tumor in the early 2000's. She wasn’t expected to make it. The tumor was the size of a baseball.

My father spent countless days crying, but I was too young to know what was really going on.

My mother was dying.

God gave us another miracle.

The doctors took the tumor out of my mother with only minor consequences (deaf in one ear, one eye cannot produce tears, and permanent nerve damage on one side of her face).

My mother still loves me to this day, and I am lucky.

I have a good life. Sometimes I take it for granted. Hug your parents today, or give them a call. Just tell them you love them, and tell them thanks.

Whomever is reading this, if you’re a parent, give your child a hug, and tell them you love them. It goes a long way. I promise.

I am lucky. I love my family.

Show your support

Clapping shows how much you appreciated Cody Uhls’s story.