This week we’ll dive into America’s favorite salad: the Caesar Salad. Its creation is generally attributed to restaurateur Caesar Cardini, an Italian immigrant who operated restaurants in Mexico and the United States. Cardini made do with what he had when a Fourth of July rush in 1924 depleted his kitchen’s supplies.

This green salad of romaine lettuce and croutons is dressed with lemon juice, olive oil, egg, Worcestershire sauce, anchovies, garlic, Dijon mustard, Parmesan cheese, and black pepper. In its original form, this salad was prepared and served table-side. …


This week we’ll dive into fried rice. It was first developed during the Sui Dynasty (581–618) in China and as such all fried rice dishes can trace their origins to Chinese fried rice. It is a popular component of many Southeast Asian cuisines.

Fried rice is a dish of cooked rice that has been stir-fried and is usually mixed with other ingredients (often left over from other dishes) such as eggs, vegetables, seafood, or meat. Let’s get to it and cook up a delicious fried rice of your own.

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This week we’ll dive into Lasagna. Possibly one of the oldest types of pasta. This popular Italian dish is made of stacked layers of thin flat pasta alternating with fillings such as ragù (ground meats and tomato sauce), vegetables and cheese. The dish is typically topped with grated mozzarella cheese and then baked in the oven.

As with most other types of pasta, the Italian word is a plural form: lasagne meaning more than one sheet of lasagna, though in many other languages (and in the south of Italy) a derivative of the singular word lasagna is used. …


Welcome to Taco Tuesday on Friday. This week we’ll dive into tacos de pescado. This type of taco originated in Baja California in Mexico. The port town of Ensenada is cited as the fish taco’s true home, dating at least from the opening of the mercado, in 1958.

They traditionally consist of grilled or fried fish, lettuce or cabbage, pico de gallo, and a tangy mayonnaise sauce, all placed on top of a corn or flour tortilla. Let’s get to it and cook up some delicious fish tacos of your own.

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This week we’ll dive into Shepherd’s pie. Also known as cottage pie or hachis parmentier. It is simple and homely comfort food with its origins in England and Ireland. In early cookery books, the dish was a means of using leftover ingredients.

The dish has many variations, but the defining ingredients are ground meat cooked in a gravy with onions, and topped with a layer of mashed potato before it is baked. Let’s get to it and cook up a delicious Shepherd’s pie of your own.

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This week we’ll dive into Gnocchi (properly pronounced as “nyawk-kee”). These versatile Italian dumplings are beautiful baked, fried or boiled. Like many Italian dishes, gnocchi have considerable variation in recipes and names across different regions. Common accompaniments of gnocchi include melted butter with sage, pesto, as well as various sauces.

The dough for gnocchi is most often rolled out before it is cut into small pieces about the size of a wine cork. The little dumplings are then pressed with a fork or a cheese grater to make ridges that can hold sauce. …


This week we’ll dive into pancakes. An American breakfast or brunch would simply be incomplete without them piled high and served with syrup, butter, and all of your topping favorites.

Pancakes have been around for centuries as a favorite staple in many cultures’ diets. The name “pancake” started during the 15th century but became standard in 19th century America. Perviously, they were called indian cakes, hoe cakes, johnnycakes, journey cakes, buckwheat cakes, buckwheats, griddle cakes, and flapjacks. Let’s get to it and cook up a delicious pancakes of your own.

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This week we’ll dive into Japanese Ramen (literally: “pulled noodles”). A few hundred years before instant ramen appeared on the scene (invented in 1958), ramen rose to fame in Asia as a go-to dish for blue collar workers. While most people typically think of ramen as Japanese in origin, this slurpable dish actually traces its roots back to China.

A typical ramen noodle soup consists of Chinese wheat noodles served in a broth, often flavored with soy sauce or miso, and uses toppings such as sliced pork, nori (dried seaweed), menma (bamboo shoots), and scallions. …


This week we’ll dive into Penne alla Vodka. An Italian pasta dish with vodka, usually made with heavy cream, crushed tomatoes, onions. Although the exact origins are unclear, the first use of vodka in a pasta dish was documented in 1974, when the Italian actor Ugo Tognazzi published the cookbook L’Abbuffone.

The recipe became very popular in Italy and and the United States around the 1980s, when it was offered to discotheque customers. The recipe thus became an icon of the fashionable cuisine of the time. Even today, penne alla vodka is a typical dish of Italian-American cuisine. …


This week we’ll dive into authentic Enchiladas. Originating in Mexico, where the practice of rolling tortillas around other food dates back at least to Aztec times. Enchilada is the past participle of Spanish enchilar, “to add chili pepper to”.

Enchiladas can be filled with various ingredients, including meats, cheese, beans, potatoes, vegetables or combinations. Usually covered with a chili-based sauce. Let’s get to it and cook up some delicious Enchiladas of your own.

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About

CookUp

Every week we’ll dive into one popular international dish with curated videos and recipes from the best cooks. Let’s cook up something delicious!

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