The quintessential garden and lawn weed, dandelions have a bad reputation among those who want grass that looks as uniform as a golf course, but every part of this common edible weed is tasty both raw and cooked, from the roots to the blossoms. Dandelion leaves can be harvested at any point in the growing season, and while the smaller leaves are considered to be less bitter and more palatable raw, the bigger leaves can be eaten as well, especially as an addition to a green salad. If raw dandelion leaves don’t appeal to you, they can also be steamed or added to a stir-fry or soup, which can make them taste less bitter. The flowers are sweet and crunchy, and can be eaten raw, or breaded and fried, or even used to make dandelion wine. The root of the dandelion can be dried and roasted and used as a coffee substitute, or added to any recipe that calls for root vegetables.

Nutrition Facts

Dandelion greens, raw
Amount Per
1 cup, chopped (55 g)
Calories 25
% Daily Value*
Total Fat 0.4 g 0%
Saturated fat 0.1 g 0%
Polyunsaturated fat 0.2 g
Monounsaturated fat 0 g
Cholesterol 0 mg 0%
Sodium 42 mg 1%
Potassium 218 mg 6%
Total Carbohydrate 5 g 1%
Dietary fiber 1.9 g 7%
Sugar 0.4 g
Protein 1.5 g 3%
Vitamin A 111% Vitamin C 32%
Calcium 10% Iron 9%
Vitamin D 0% Vitamin B-6 5%
Vitamin B-12 0% Magnesium 5%