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What I’m about to say is going to shock you: there isn’t a single fiction book written by a Copt in the history of the English-speaking Coptic Diaspora that has been published traditionally. That’s right: not a single Coptic person has ever published a fiction novel in English that a publishing company printed.

We’ve entered every other field in western society and excelled: we’re inventors, engineers, actors, doctors, thinkers, activists, and more. But for some reason, we’re not fiction writers.

That’s not to say that we’re not writers, period. That is far from the truth. On the contrary, we have several Copts who have written best-selling nonfiction books. For example, Marty Makary, a world-famous surgeon at John Hopkins, wrote a bestseller about Mama Maggie, and his other book “Unaccountable” is becoming the basis for a new network drama called “The Resident.” …


Tracing the history of Middle Eastern racial classification in America

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A few weeks ago, I was working on a grant that would help to decrease tobacco-related health disparities among minority populations. The table I was using looked a little something like this:

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And this was the graph:

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In fact, throughout most of my undergraduate and post-graduate career, I became very familiar with the “Hispanic, non-Hispanic White, African American/Black, Asian/Pacific Islander” dynamic. …


Egypt’s Silent Humanitarian Crisis

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The Problem

When I told people that I was going to take on Female Genital Mutilation for the Coptic Voice, I got one of two responses:

“What’s that?” and:

“That’s not a problem for Copts; we don’t have that.”

That second answer is far from the truth, and the first answer reflects the general lack of awareness for this crime against humanity. Female Genital Mutilation (FGM for short) is a taboo subject in our culture but is nearly universal in Egypt (both within the Coptic community as well as the Muslim community). …


One Therapist’s Perspective on Child Separation

Many of my memories in childhood revolve around the Coptic Orthodox Church and the community I grew up in. My sister and I always looked forward to the weekends, where we spent evenings and afternoons with our friends in activities, liturgies, prayers, and Sunday school. We learned about what it meant to be a Christian, and perhaps one of the hardest lessons we learned is one we all probably can agree we struggle with now: “Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and all you mind’ This is the first and greatest commandment. …


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I have been reflecting lately on the ways in which our culture affects how we practice our faith. Culture isn’t just our ethnicity, the language we speak, the foods we eat, the clothes we wear, or the traditions we engage in.

Instead, culture dictates how we think, where our values lie, and what our beliefs are about how the world operates. Secondly, cultures change throughout history. One example is the common historical trope of looking back at what was culturally or socially acceptable fifty years ago and being horrified, just as those in fifty years will do to us. …


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*NOTE: We’ve moved! To read the rest of this article, please visit www.copticvoiceus.com and be sure to subscribe so you can receive updates on new articles right in your inbox!

I was in fourth grade. I was sitting in class, jittery with excitement, smile beaming from ear to ear. My grandmother had agreed to visit my class and talk to them about her migration from Egypt to America in 1969. With her, she brought small statues of pyramids, scrolls of papyrus filled with colorful pictures of pharaohs and hieroglyphics, and of course, her Bible and cross.

With some trepidation, she began to talk about her experience of being a Coptic Christian in Egypt. She spoke of the fear in just walking to school at times, the name calling (Kafir, كافر‎ being the most common, defined as an unbeliever or an infidel), and the overall sense of feeling unsafe, marginalized, and less than. …


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*NOTE: We’ve moved! To read the rest of this article, please visit www.copticvoiceus.com and be sure to subscribe so you can receive updates on new articles right in your inbox!

A few weeks ago during a dinner conversation with my wife, we contemplated what our 2 year old toddler would think of herself as she grows up. Would she think of herself culturally as an American, Egyptian, or Copt?

My wife quickly concluded that it doesn’t really matter what her cultural identity will be, for as long as she is a good Christian, she will be okay. …


Ekhristos Anisty! First, we wanted to say thank you so much for all of the support and encouragement that Coptic Voice has received by people all over the United States. We started this blog as a way to help forge our American Coptic identity through the written word, and since we started this adventure six months ago, that is exactly what we’ve seen happen.

In fact, as more people become involved in the Coptic Voice’s process, our blog has started to outgrow Medium.

Because of this, we are moving to our own hosted domain website, www.copticvoiceus.com. There, we can work to further connect Copts all throughout the western world while also better managing our content. We also added a “subscribe” feature so that whenever a new article is posted, it can go straight to your email. …


Barriers to Treatment for MENA Communities

As a psychotherapist who has practiced for the better part of a decade, I’ve seen and worked with a wide variety of patients. Working in Southern California (especially around the LA area) has given me the opportunity to treat clientele from a plethora of diverse cultural, ethnic, and religious backgrounds — including people from my own community.

Coming from an Egyptian and Jordanian background, I can say I have a fairly unique position in being able to comprehend multiple dialects of Arabic and having a pretty solid understanding of the multifaceted cultural issues that arise for many patients with backgrounds from the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). …


How the Supreme Court’s Ruling that undocumented immigrants, legal immigrants, and immigrants seeking asylum can be held indefinitely may end up hurting Copts.

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Martin Niemoller, an anti-Nazi Lutheran Pastor living in Germany during Hitler’s reign, who ended up in a concentration camp himself, is known for speaking out about injustice. In his most well-known statement, Niemoller says:

“First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out-

Because I was not a socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out-

Because i was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak…

Coptic Voice

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