Documentary photographer Ivan Agerton started experiencing psychotic symptoms in mid-December, after a mild case of Covid-19. He had trouble sleeping, bouts of paranoia, and auditory hallucinations, the New York Times reports. Agerton shared his story to raise awareness about the condition, which is rare but has affected people around the world who have no history of mental illness.

Experts hypothesize that psychosis is a brain-related effect of Covid-19 that may result from the immune response, vascular issues, or surges of disease-related inflammation. Still, as the Times notes, “Much about the condition remains mysterious.”

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Research published in February in the science journal BMJ showed that people infected with the B.1.1.7 variant of the coronavirus, which was first identified in the United Kingdom, are more likely to die than people infected with the original strain. This scary news was surprising to some people, writes scientist…

Many Black people experience vaccine hesitancy because of the long history of racism in health care in the United States, which in many ways is still present today. This racism is important to acknowledge, and so is the fact that vaccination is critical to ending the Covid-19 pandemic and protecting…

The Biden administration brokered the deal between the two competitors

Johnson & Johnson’s one-shot Covid-19 vaccine was authorized for emergency use by the Food and Drug Administration on Saturday, but the bulk of its doses won’t be available until the end of March. Manufacturing delays have stalled production of the vaccine at the company’s plant in Baltimore.

To help speed…

Coronavirus Blog Team

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